'holiday cocktails' on Serious Eats

Grapefruit Champagne Float

This sorbet can be whipped up a few hours before guests arrive. Serve the float in individual flutes or bowls, or as a large punch with the sorbet floating in the center. I use 2 to 3 ounces of Champagne for a medium-sized scoop, which should get you around 8 servings with one bottle of Champagne. More

Kumquat Margarita

Olive-sized kumquats have an edible peel that's sweet while the flesh is tart. A hearty muddling brings out the oils from their skin as well as the juice from their flesh, bringing that tartness that's key to a balanced margarita. More

French 75

According to Ted Haigh (aka Dr. Cocktail), the French 75 is one of two cocktails named after the French 75-mm field gun, which was commonly used in World War I. "One barman in 1947," reports Haigh, "called it a Tom Collins with champagne instead of club soda. Vive la difference!" Here's Haigh's version of the recipe, from his wonderful book, Vintage Spirits and Forgotten Cocktails. More

Winter Drinks With Will: The Dead Leaf

This is my favorite time of year for many reasons, none of which involve snow or gourds and several of which involve whiskey. This time of year, bourbon is ready to be tricked out with something more interesting than summer's ice-and-soda or deeper winter's tumbler-and-depression. The Dead Leaf is what I've come up with, and it's good. More

Apple Brandy Old-Fashioned

An Old-Fashioned Whiskey Cocktail is a simple mixture of whiskey, sugar, bitters and a citrus peel. It is a sublimely simple and delicious preparation for a wide range of spirits besides just whiskey—rum, tequila, brandy—and a fine apple brandy is no exception. Showcasing the earthy flavor of fermented apples with just a bit of sugar and bitters is a perfect preparation to enjoy classic holiday flavors in a new way. More

Flaming Holiday Punch

I've been mixing variations of a Flaming Holiday Punch (known in some circles as "English Bishop") every December for years now. The base recipe is from Esquire's Handbook for Hosts, from 1949, which is nice on its own but quite open to improvisation. The ingredients are a cinch: a bottle of aged rum poured into a punch bowl over baked oranges studded with cloves. Toss in a little sugar and some holiday spice, turn down the lights before you apply a match to the hot liquid (careful!) and conversation is pretty much guaranteed to stop. More

Hot Coffee Grog

If there's been one simple message that's come out of the Four Loko hullaballoo, it's that mixing caffeine and alcohol is a bad idea. Now that this preliminary is out of the way, let's get down to doing that very thing. There are plenty of versions of the Hot Coffee Grog floating around in the booze world. Some contain cream or butter (or, in one tiki-fied version, coconut cream), and some are laced with a range of liqueurs. More

How to Make Spiced Rum From Scratch

Making spiced rum is deliriously easy. Simply take your desired mix of spices and other ingredients, pop them in a bottle of rum for, oh, two days, then taste. Need the spice mix a bit stronger? Let it sit a day or two more, or, edit the taste profile as you go, adding more of an ingredient if you wish to push it forward. More

Time for a Drink: Hot Buttered Rum

Let's start the weekend right--with a cocktail recipe from Paul Clarke (The Cocktail Chronicles). Need more than one? Hit up the archives. Cheers! Until very recently, I found the concept of hot-buttered rum more appealing than the reality hot-buttered rum.... More

Time for a Drink: Brigadier

A classic combination that's good at this time of year is a mixture of good hot chocolate and green Chartreuse. While the pairing might seem awkward at first glance, there's something about the potent herbal liqueur that matches perfectly with the rich earthiness of good chocolate. More

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