'french' on Serious Eats

Traditional French Cassoulet

The first time I had cassoulet in its home turf it was a revelation. This loose, almost soup-like stew of beans and meat was so far removed from all versions of cassoulet I'd had in the United States, or even in other parts of France. It was a large, bubbling vat of beans and meat, covered in a crust so dark that it was almost black. Rich, meaty, and overwhelmingly simple, the main flavor was just that of the cured meat, a good stock, and beans. More

Endive, Shallot, and Goat Cheese Tart

If you only know endive as a crunchy, leafy, bitter green, then you've been missing out. Roasted, grilled, or sautéed, the wide-leafed vegetable loses much of its trademark bitterness, allowing its sweet, faintly earthy character to emerge at full force. Here, it's combined with shallots and goat cheese for a rich, buttery quiche-like tart. More

Iced Yogurt With Mead-Baked Peach From 'Paris Pastry Club'

When fruit is at its peak, it's best served simply; something that Paris Pastry Club author Fanny Zanotti knows well. This recipe for mead-baked peaches comes from a childhood memory of picking peaches in an orchard, and having them prepared just this way for dessert. The tangy yogurt is a lovely counterpoint to the soft, yielding flesh of the peaches. Crunchy honeycomb candy echoes the notes of honey in the mead, and provides a pleasant crunch. More

Piperade From 'Buvette: The Pleasure of Good Food'

Imagine waking up, head throbbing, room spinning, stomach growling. Too. Much. Wine. Waiting in the kitchen, left by some benevolent fantasy akin to the Easter Bunny or Tooth Fairy, is a pan steaming with silky, slightly caramelized peppers and onions, crumbles of spicy chorizo, and golden, life-giving eggs. This is Jody Williams' Piperade from her book, Buvette: The Pleasure of Good Food. More

Nantucket Scallop Ceviche, Blood Orange Sauce From 'Daniel'

I usually think of ceviches as quick, simple affairs. Cut up some seafood, throw it in a bowl with citrus juice, let it "cook" for a bit, and then serve. Daniel Boulud's scallop ceviche with blood orange sauce in his new cookbook, Daniel, is not that kind of ceviche. But the extra work actually pays off, and the final dish was probably the best ceviche I'd ever made, and certainly the prettiest. More

Easy One-Pot Chicken Bouillabaisse

Bouillabaisse is a classic southern French seafood stew flavored with tomatoes, saffron, and fennel, served with a garlicky mayonnaise-like sauce. Could we make these flavors work with chicken and cut the cooking time down to under half an hour start to finish? More

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