'dumplings' on Serious Eats

Pan-fried Kimchi Dumplings (Mandu) from 'The Kimchi Cookbook'

Preparing homemade dumplings can often seem like a daunting task, and when the filling is a simple mixture of ground beef or potatoes, the one-note result makes the project seem less worthwhile. Not so with Lauryn Chun's Pan-fried Kimchi Dumplings from The Kimchi Cookbook. Loaded with bright, crunchy kimchi; tofu, beef, and sesame oil, these dumplings are worth every minute spent filling and crimping. More

Mile End's Knishes

More than just a fun-to-say word, knishes are emblematic of Jewish deli snacks. Their hearty nature and portable shape make for an easy, if heavy, snack on the go. The version at the Mile End Deli is a different shape than most: rolled into a log instead of shaped into a dumpling, transforming the knish into light(-er) fare. More

Sunday Brunch: Maple Syrup Dumplings

These sweet dumplings blur the line between brunch and dessert, but some mornings call for a bit of sugar, or maple syrup. Instead of using syrup as a garnish it becomes the central player in this warm, sweet breakfast. These dumplings come out plump and coated in reduced syrup, and although the rye whiskey is optional it adds an agreeable boozy element to this dish. More

Cook the Book: Turkey with Spicy Black Beans in Tofu Dumplings 

Turkey with Spicy Black Beans in Tofu Dumplings is Anita Lo's adaptation of two favorite Chinese dishes, mapo tofu and steamed dumplings. By stuffing little rounds (or squares) of tofu with ground turkey mixed with scallions, fermented black beans, and doban djan, a Sichuan chile sauce, and steaming them, she's created little self contained packages filled with all of the salty, spicy flavors that make mapo tofu so irresistible. More

Sunday Supper: Lamb Stew with Poppy Seed Dumplings

This simple lamb stew is topped with large dumplings that can easily soak up all the meaty juices. Depending on your preference for the consistency of this stew, you could easily add another cup of stock and punch up the seasoning with more salt and pepper. A handful of frozen peas mixed in to the stew just before the dumplings are added can add some nice color as well as flavor. More

Seriously Asian: Big Wontons

No, these wontons aren't super-sized. The Chinese make a distinction between "big" wontons, which are made with wrappers filled with meat and vegetables, and "small" wontons, which are filled with only meat and use much thinner wrappers. Compared to other dumplings like Chinese jiaozi or Korean mandu, wontons are easier and more forgiving to make at home. More

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