'dumpling' on Serious Eats

Light and Tender Potato Gnocchi With Sage-Butter Sauce

We're not going to lie: Potato gnocchi can be a little tricky and require some practice to get right. But if you know a few basic rules, it's really not that hard to make ones that are light and tender, not leaden and gummy. This recipe walks you through those steps, starting with choosing a gnocchi-friendly potato and cooking it the right way; then we leave it up to you whether to add egg yolk or not (yolks make a dough that's easier to work with, but also firmer); and finally we add just enough flour to make a cohesive dough while being careful not to overwork it to the point of gumminess. The result are lovely little gnocchi in a sage-butter sauce that will prove that good gnocchi aren't out of reach. More

Ponzu-Ginger Dipping Sauce

This no-cook dipping sauce features ponzu, the citrus- and soy-spiked Japanese sauce, that's enlivened with ginger, scallions, and sesame oil. It's reminiscent of teriyaki, but substantially more complex. Try it with dumplings, simply cooked chicken, or steamed or roasted fish. More

Coconut Curry Dipping Sauce

South Asian flavors come together harmoniously in this easy dipping sauce, made by warming red curry paste with coconut milk, then rounding out and boosting their flavors with honey, soy sauce, fish sauce, ginger, and lime. It's perfect as a dip for dumplings, or with poached chicken. More

Black Bean Dipping Sauce With Maple Syrup

Chinese fermented black soy beans are eye-bulgingly salty and all kinds of funky. Here, its fermented tang is transformed into a delicious dipping sauce with the help of maple syrup, creamy peanut butter, and a little chili oil for some warm heat. It's perfect as a dip for dumplings, and is also delicious with roasted chicken and seared pork chops. More

Thai-Style Dipping Sauce

To make this amazing dipping sauce for dumplings, we start with the classic combination of Asian fish sauce, lime juice, and sugar, then punch it up with raw garlic, fresh cilantro, and hot chili flakes. The flavors blend seamlessly into a sauce that's versatile enough to dress a salad, marinate a steak, and, yes, coat your dumplings. More

Kimchi and Honey Dipping Sauce

If you've never heard of kimchi paste, you're not alone. It's a simple combination of red pepper flakes, garlic, ginger, sugar, lime juice, water, salt, and fish sauce, but the easiest way to get it is to buy it at Korean grocers and Asian specialty markets, where it's often labeled as "kimchi base." It's punchy and sharp, tangy, and incredibly invigorating. To turn it into a dip for dumplings, we temper it with honey, sesame seeds, and melted butter to create a smooth sauce that's intensely sweet, spicy, buttery, and just a little nutty all at once. More

Homemade Wonton Soup

A classic wonton soup made with Chinese superior stock flavored with chicken, pork, ham, and shrimp. The wontons are stuffed with a mixture of pork and shrimp. The shrimp are brined in a solution of salt and baking soda to make them extra crisp. More

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