'drinks' on Serious Eats

Boiled Coke with Ginger and Lemon

Boiled Coke with ginger and lemon started off as a popular cold remedy in Hong Kong, but now it's a popular anytime drink that's found at pretty much all Hong Kong diners. As a first-time, not sick drinker, I found it surprisingly pleasant. The cold and fizzy are gone, but you're left with sweet, spicy, a little tart, a smidge medicinal—all things that would feel restorative on a cold day or in a stream of warmth going down a sore throat. More

DIY Rice Milk

While similar to the commercial options, this DIY recipe is not an exact replica of what's on grocery store shelves. If you're looking for a cost-saving option that you are free to flavor to suit your own preferences, however, this is a great way to go. More

Homemade Soy Milk

This fresh, clean homemade soy milk is delicious on its own. But you can add vanilla, almond extract, honey, or sugar. The nice thing is you get to control how much goes in, unlike the sweetened store-bought versions, which also happen to be quite a bit more expensive. More

Cold-Processed Shrub

This recipe makes about 20 to 24 ounces of shrub syrup, enough to make anywhere from 10 to 20 drinks, depending on how much syrup you use per drink. Store it for up to a year in your fridge. The acid and sugar will preserve the syrup and keep it tasting bright and fresh. More

Light and Frothy Raspberry Faluda

Faluda, like many Indian sweets, can be a heavy, super-sweet affair. There's a place for it, but not during the first days of spring. This version froths puréed raspberries with milk (though you could as easily use yogurt, half-and-half, or melted kulfi ice cream). You could sweeten it as much as you like, layer it with whipped cream, or spike it with ginger and cardamom. This lighter version just adds a garnish of candied ginger, which you could also dice up and add to the basil seed. More

Nam Manglak Spritzer

Nam manglak can be as simple as water, crushed ice, basil seed, and some sweetener. This is ever so slightly more gussied up: flavored with rose, lime, and honey, made effervescent by rosewater. It's an unbeatably refreshing combination for the hot sticky days to come. More

Time for a Drink: the Vesper

Introduced to the world in 1953 in Casino Royale—the first book in what became Ian Fleming's sprawling James Bond franchise—the Vesper has had more popularity in print and in film than it's ever had inside a glass. Which is too bad, actually, considering it's actually a pretty decent drink. More

Time for a Drink: the Bombay Cocktail

Here's a brandy-based classic that dates to at least 1930: the Bombay Cocktail. I first tasted this drink several months ago at Bar Agricole in San Francisco. Medium-bodied and full of flavor without coming on too aggressive, the Bombay Cocktail offers a glimpse at another time, when brandy was one of the regents of the cocktail kingdom. More

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