'deborah madison' on Serious Eats

Deborah Madison's Spring Garden Hodgepodge of Radishes, Leeks, and Peas Depending ...

You gotta love a cookbook author bold enough to use the words "hodgepodge" and "depending" in the same recipe title. Yet as Deborah Madison explains in her new book, Vegetable Literacy, "Depending is the operative word when there is a garden or good farmers' market." Indeed, when shopping seasonally, you'll never really know what'll look good until you see it. So, go ahead, embrace the hodgepodge of spring vegetables, and adapt Madison's gentle cooking technique and emphatic use of excellent butter to suit your spring haul. More

Deborah Madison's Summer Squash Tartines with Rosemary and Lemon

It may not be zucchini season quite yet, but I'd advise squirreling away Deborah Madison's Summer Squash Tartines recipe from her new book, Vegetable Literacy, for dinner parties in the coming months. Another winning bread-cheese-vegetable combination, these open-faced sandwiches are just the thing when you've got a couple of cucurbits hanging around the house. Sure, anyone can throw cheese on bread and call it an appetizer. Yet Madison's little touches, like rubbing the bread with garlic and gently cooking the squash with a saute-steam method, make these tartines more than a slapdash effort at a snack. More

Deborah Madison's Peas with Baked Ricotta and Bread Crumbs

Shucking fresh peas is not a quick task, I'll admit. But if you can get your hands on some fresh peas in their pods at a farmers' market in the next couple of weeks, grab them and commit to an extra half hour of meal prep. Deborah Madison's unassuming Peas with Baked Ricotta from her new book Vegetable Literacy is worth it. The bright sweetness of the buttery peas matches perfectly with the creamy richness of fresh ricotta, and baking the ricotta with olive oil and fresh bread crumbs transforms cheese and peas into an actual meal. More

Deborah Madison's Cauliflower with Saffron, Pepper Flakes, Plenty of Parsley, and Pasta

Deborah Madison's cauliflower and pasta dish from her new cookbook Vegetable Literacy is a surprise of a recipe. It almost looks like something I'd throw together without thinking, but has a few tweaks that make it stand out from my ordinary dinners. First, she uses what may look like a dangerous amount of red pepper flakes; her scant teaspoon looks menacing compared to my usual pinch or two. Also, she throws in parsley, lots of parsley, in three places--some of it is cooked with garlic to mellow, some of it is wilted into the cooked pasta, and the rest is thrown in at the end for a bright finish. But the real winner here is saffron. The floral taste of saffron always reminds me of bouillabaisse; tasting bites of Madison's cauliflower dish takes my mind to the French stew but for much less time and effort. More

Deborah Madison's Tangelo-Tangerine Pudding

The Tangelo-Tangerine Puddings from Seasonal Fruit Desserts by Deborah Madison have a lot of good things going for them. First off they're a gorgeous, vibrant shade of orange that brings to mind all sorts of happy things (sunshine, sherbet). Secondly, they are the perfect summer dessert—less than five minutes of heat on the stovetop then a chill in the fridge means you won't suffer from the dreaded summer kitchen sweats. And lastly, they are dairy-free, gluten-free, and even vegan if you opt to sweeten them with agave instead of sugar or honey. More

Deborah Madison's Two Summer Rhubarb Purées

These two rhubarb purées from Seasonal Fruit Desserts exemplify the lovely simplicity of Deborah Madison's approach to desert-making. Just a few stalks of rhubarb, a cup of sugar, a pinch of salt, and some citrus are simmered together to create a two uniquely flavored, versatile purées that can be used as a topping for ice cream, a drizzle over pound cake, or when reduced further, a filling for a simple tart. More

Cook the Book: Chocolate Mousse with Cardamom Seeds

This Chocolate Mousse with Cardamom is a dessert that anyone would be thrilled to eat at a restaurant that has "special occasion" written all over it, yet you can make it at home in about an hour, and most of that hour is the time that is spent cooling in the fridge. The best part about making chocolate mousse at home is that you end up with a big bowl of chocolate mousse. More

Tuna Spread with Capers

The following recipe is from the August 19 edition of our weekly recipe newsletter. To receive this newsletter in your inbox, sign up here! I always keep a few emergency cans of tuna in my cupboard—their presence reassures me that... More

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