'chicken soup' on Serious Eats

Mile End's Gribenes and Schmaltz

Schmaltz is a useful cooking fat to keep around the house; for our Cook the Book feature this week, it is used in Soup Mandel and Knishes. Keep the resulting Gribenes (fried chicken skin crackling) for snacks while you're cooking or toss them in a salad. If you don't have extra chicken skin hanging around the kitchen, call a butcher shop ahead of time and have them reserve it for you. More

Mile End's Chicken Soup with Soup Mandel

Once the calendar flips to September, my mind begins drifting to fall. It matters little what the thermometer reads, the post-Labor Day season is a time for apples, hearty greens, and, of course, chicken soup. For me, the magical elixir cures not only cold symptoms, but back-to-school (or work) jitters as well. In The Mile End Cookbook, Noah and Rae Bernamoff present a simple yet full-bodied and rich take on the classic. More

Spicy Chicken Noodle Soup with Lime and Ginger

The end result is a soup that's as fortifying as the best chicken noodle, but with a bit of kick from its sour/sweet/pungent flavor profile. With nothing but a single burner, a chicken, and a few vegetables, you can pull together a good soup in about an hour. The first key is to make extracting flavor and gelatin from the chicken bones as easy as possible. This means chopping the carcass into very fine pieces. More

Cook the Book: Gondi, Chicken and Chickpea Dumplings in a Broth

Janna Gur's The Book of New Israeli Food includes a chapter devoted to foods that are traditionally eaten on the sabbath in Israel. Some are familiar (chopped liver and chicken noodle soup) while others are a bit more exotic. Gondi, an Iranian-Jewish take on matzo ball soup, falls somewhere in between. Chicken soup with big, fluffy matzo meal dumplings is a Passover classic that has potential for greatness but also a tendency to be a little bland depending on your seasoning strategy. Gondi, on the other hand, is all about big, bold flavors. More

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