'beverages' on Serious Eats

Light and Frothy Raspberry Faluda

Faluda, like many Indian sweets, can be a heavy, super-sweet affair. There's a place for it, but not during the first days of spring. This version froths puréed raspberries with milk (though you could as easily use yogurt, half-and-half, or melted kulfi ice cream). You could sweeten it as much as you like, layer it with whipped cream, or spike it with ginger and cardamom. This lighter version just adds a garnish of candied ginger, which you could also dice up and add to the basil seed. More

Nam Manglak Spritzer

Nam manglak can be as simple as water, crushed ice, basil seed, and some sweetener. This is ever so slightly more gussied up: flavored with rose, lime, and honey, made effervescent by rosewater. It's an unbeatably refreshing combination for the hot sticky days to come. More

Time for a Drink: Americano

The Americano is sometimes derided as an emasculated Negroni; that overlooks the drink's enduring charms. While less potent in flavor and effect than the Negroni, the Americano is a very agreeable companion on a warm day, especially in the late spring when the barbecue is being brought out of winter storage and the weather invites you to linger outside. Engagingly bitter, slightly sweet, and above all, tall and cold, the Americano suits the season. More

Time for a Drink: The Bronx

Let's be honest: The Bronx is unlikely to be anyone's favorite drink. But while it's not exactly bottled excitement, The Bronx is actually pretty good, and surprisingly refreshing. Be sure to use fresh-squeezed orange juice (and if you add a dash or two of Angostura bitters, you've got a somewhat tastier Income Tax Cocktail on your hands), and approach it with an open mind. More

Fort Washington Flip

Mixed with applejack, Benedictine and maple syrup, the Fort Washington Flip retains hints of the winter just past; given the early Easter this year, don't be surprised if the weather suits up to match the drink. More

Time for a Drink: The Rose

Rescued from a vintage bar menu by cocktail historian David Wondrich, the Rose enjoyed a brief flash of popularity at the Chatham Hotel in Paris in the 1920s. Good luck finding it since then, which is a shame; soft, floral, lightly sweet and with a titillating aroma from the cherry eau de vie, the Rose is an exercise in delicate decadence, a drink that, like the Widow's Kiss, can put the imbiber in a mindset from a completely different era. More

Time for a Drink: Trilby

There are several drinks that go by the name "Trilby;" I don't know where this one originated, but I really like it as an aperitif, and keep one at hand when preparing a weekend dinner. It's simple, yet elegant, and soft but not too much; if you're looking for an engaging pre-dinner companion, you could do a lot worse. More

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