'beef' on Serious Eats

American Chop Suey (Macaroni, Beef, and Cheese Skillet Casserole)

Beefaroni, macaroni and beef, chili mac, Johnny Marzetti, or American chop suey, call it what you will, but whatever its origins, there's one thing for sure: the stuff is delicious. Tender pasta with a rich tomato and beef sauce flavored with garlic and oregano, cooked together with onions and peppers, and finished with cheese, this is Italian-American comfort food at its finest. Not only that, but it's a ridiculously easy dish to put together, cooked 100% on the stovetop, and requiring nothing more than a pot, a bowl, and about half an hour of your time. More

Curried Jamaican Beef Patties

These flaky Jamaican meat patties are filled with curried ground beef, onion, garlic, and Scotch bonnet pepper, plus a slew of aromatic herbs and spices. Formed into half-moon shapes, the patties are cooked until golden in the oven—eating them is almost as good as an actual trip to Jamaica. Almost. More

Smashed Reuben Burgers

Sure, the Reuben sandwich is a classic that can't be improved. That doesn't mean magic won't happen when it's reimagined as a hamburger. Here, we take a page from the Gospel of Slider and the Gospel of Smashed, to create a gooey, dripping, crusty, delicious Reuben burger. More

Beef Ribs From 'Pitt Cue Co.: The Cookbook'

The four partners from the London BBQ restaurant Pitt Cue Co. are serious about their meat. In the new (to the U.S.) Pitt Cue Co.: The Cookbook, they strongly encourage homecooks to get serious, too. This recipe turned out smoky, unctuous, crazy flavorful ribs. It is one of the simpler preparations in the book, requiring only the ribs and the House Rub; sauce is optional and unnecessary. More

Slow-Smoked Porterhouse Steaks

Smoking is generally a method reserved for long-cooking, tough cuts like pork shoulder, ribs, or beef brisket, intended to deeply flavor and tenderize the meat over the course of a half day of cooking. But with a bit of finesse and a couple hours of free time, it's perfectly possible to get that same smoky flavor into a thick-cut steak and still have it come out perfectly medium-rare and juicy, so long as you play your cards right. Here's how it's done. More

Stir-Fried Beef With Kale and Frisée in Black Bean Sauce

This dish, which is made up of equal parts beef and greens in a light but flavor-packed black bean sauce with garlic doesn't quite qualify as a side dish, and seeing as I'm using a mixture of kale and frisée—two decidedly Western greens—it doesn't quite qualify as "Chinese greens" either. But the basic techniques I use in ut—just a quick stir-fry with no blanching—is a method that works with any kind of hearty green leafy vegetable, whether it's Chinese or not. More

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