'New Orleans' on Serious Eats

Creole Succotash from 'Treme'

The succotash I grew up eating was a simple side dish of lima beans, corn, onion, black pepper, and a big hunk of butter. But despite my familiarity with the basic version, I am open to different interpretations of the dish (as long as it still contains butter, corn, and limas, of course). This creole succotash from the Treme cookbook is kind of like a tricked out version of the classic. In addition to the requisite vegetables, you'll find okra, celery, bell pepper, shrimp, and two kinds of pork. More

Doberge Cake

New Orleans may be best known around these parts for beignets and King Cake, but when it comes time to celebrate your birthday in the Big Easy, it's the Doberge Cake (that's pronounced DOUGH-bash for the folks at home), a layered cake with lemon and chocolate that steals the show. More

Beignets

For folks outside of New Orleans, the square, fried fritters which are covered (perhaps buried) in powdered sugar are probably most closely associated with the French Quarter's famed Cafe Du Monde, a coffee shop established back in 1862. More

Cook the Book: Fried Chicken with New Orleans Confetti

Austin Leslie is known in New Orleans as the "Godfather of Fried Chicken." He died tragically in the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina, but his legacy lives on through his signature dish, Fried Chicken with New Orleans Confetti. Adapted from The Southern Foodways Alliance Community Cookbook, it's easy to see why Austin's chicken is the gold standard of New Orleans chicken. It includes the unlikely addition of evaporated milk, which adds a bit of sweetness and an incredible crunch once fried. More

Classic Muffaletta Sandwich

I like to think of the muffaletta as a distant relative of the Italian sub. They both layer on the various meats and cheese—ham, capicola, salami, mortadella, provolone—and rely on something piquant and lively to stand up to all that meat, whether that's hot peppers in an Italian or the famed olive spread of the muffaletta. More

Dinner Tonight: The Best Oyster Po' Boy Outside of New Orleans

It's such a simple sandwich, yet when you sit down with one of these, it's hard to imagine anything tasting better. The oysters are tossed in a flour and cornmeal mixture, then fried for just under a minute so the crust is crackly and golden brown, yet the oysters are still gushing with juice. The bread is important. It needs to be soft, but still have a nice crackly texture. Then it's just iceberg lettuce and mayonnaise. More

Cook the Book: St. Joseph's Fig Cookies

In honor of St. Joseph's Day, a feast day for the patron saint of cabinetmakers, engineers, Canada, and confectioners (which is where the sweets come in), try this recipe for St. Joseph's fig cookies. They're like a better, homemade version of Fig Newtons. The figginess is much less cloying and sticky and gets combined with a nice mix of sherry, orange, lemon, raisins, and walnuts. More

Cook the Book: Chicken and Smoked Sausage Gumbo

My New Orleans by John Besh includes no fewer than five recipes for gumbo, which isn't really all that shocking considering gumbo is the epitome of Louisiana cooking. This Chicken and Smoked Sausage Gumbo starts with a roux made up of equal parts fat and flour that gets slowly cooked until the mix changes from a light tan to a deep, rich brown. More

Cook the Book: Beignets

When I first visited New Orleans several years ago, I was a strict vegetarian. That meant I missed out on almost all the city's iconic culinary offerings—gumbo, po'boys, even red beans and rice. But not beignets. Light, sweet, and incredibly messy from the heavy dusting of powdered sugar they were finished with, they were entirely memorable. With the help of John Besh's beignet recipe, I stroll down memory lane. More

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