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Entries tagged with 'Lillet'

Sparkling Grapefruit Sangria With Lillet Rosé

Serious Eats Elana Lepkowski Post a comment

This sparkling sangria makes use of the French aperitif Lillet Rosé, which comes already flavored with sweet and bitter orange peel and fruit liqueurs to boost the flavor of the pitcher drink. More

Up in Arms

Serious Eats Lizz Schumer 7 comments

Carlos Yturria at Cafe Claude Marina in San Francisco whips up this cocktail to remind you of a stroll along the Seine. Fresh lemon adds focus to the fruity, rich Lillet, while Bonal, a bitter aperitif wine, brings it all into balance. More

Kentucky Corpse Reviver from Peels

Serious Eats Maggie Hoffman 1 comment

Perhaps you've had a Corpse Reviver #2, which brings together gin and curaçao, Lillet blanc, and lemon, with a dash of absinthe. Here's a variation from Peels restaurant in NYC that uses bourbon instead of gin, and it's delicious. Pierre Ferrand's dry curaçao is great here, but you could substitute Cointreau if you have it on hand. More

Cranberry and Lillet Rouge Sorbet

Serious Eats Max Falkowitz 1 comment

Serve this tart sorbet as a palate cleanser between courses, or as a light dessert with whipped cream and candied ginger. More

Oxley Refuge Gin and Tonic

Serious Eats Carrie Vasios Mullins Post a comment

Coconut puree, lime, and Lillet Blanc pair with gin to make a tart yet tropical drink from Duggan McDonnell of Cantina in San Francisco—it was the official cocktail of San Francisco Cocktail Week. More

Schrodinger's Cat

Serious Eats Michael J. Neff Post a comment

Schrodinger's Cat was a thought-experiment postulating a simultaneous state of existence of non-existence. For some reason, this led me to pair Mezcal and Bourbon. Remember, a cocktail is both perfect and undrinkable—until you actually taste it. More

Cheeky Negroni

Serious Eats The Serious Eats Team 2 comments

This fragrant cocktail balances delicate Hendricks gin with Lillet Blanc and Aperol. It's a lightly citrusy and herbal summer variation on the classic Negroni. More

Fizzy Gin and Lillet Punch

Serious Eats Maggie Hoffman Post a comment

We threw a little shindig today to say goodbye to SE Ad Sales Director Erin Adamo. I mixed up this bubbly punch—it's a good brunch or predinner drink: a little tart, a little sweet, and a little more complex than you'd expect. More

Lillet of the Valley

Serious Eats Chris Lehault 3 comments

Lillet of the Valley is a variation of the Col du Sabion, a drink we first encountered at the Manhattan Cocktail Classic. The lightness of cider combined with the tart and earthy citrus flavors make this drink an excellent companion while watching the sunset from your rooftop. More

Time for a Drink: the Weeski

Serious Eats Paul Clarke Post a comment

With an approachable yet distinctive flavor, Irish whiskey isn't called for in a great many cocktails, but there are a few drinks that are handy to have in your repertoire when the Powers comes out to play. Here's a contemporary cocktail that features Irish whiskey to good effect: the Weeski. More

Time for a Drink: the Vesper

Serious Eats Paul Clarke 15 comments

Introduced to the world in 1953 in Casino Royale—the first book in what became Ian Fleming's sprawling James Bond franchise—the Vesper has had more popularity in print and in film than it's ever had inside a glass. Which is too bad, actually, considering it's actually a pretty decent drink. More

Time for a Drink: Stone Fruit Sour

Serious Eats Paul Clarke 1 comment

Here's a good balancing-act drink: the Stone Fruit Sour. I wrote this drink up for the current issue of Imbibe, and it's become a welcome part of my early autumn cocktail arsenal. More

Time for a Drink: Corpse Reviver #2

Serious Eats Paul Clarke 2 comments

Enter the Corpse Reviver #2. Part of a class of "corpse reviver" cocktails—so named because of their purported ability to bring the dead (or at least painfully hungover) back to some semblance of life—this drink was a staple of bar manuals back in the 1930s, only to fall off the map in the last half of the 20th century. More

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