'Italian' on Serious Eats

Lemon-Marinated Tuscan-Jewish Fried Chicken

Tuscany and fried chicken: two things that are almost universally loved, but otherwise have very little to do with each other. Or do they? Turns out there's an awesome fried chicken dish that comes to us straight from the Jewish community of Tuscany, featuring meat that's brined in lemon juice with garlic and spices, then fried in a simple coating of flour and egg. More

Mushroom Ragù

This deeply flavorful sauce, made from both fresh and dry mushrooms, tomatoes, white wine, and aromatic vegetables, is so hearty, you won't believe it contains no meat. It's delicious on pasta or polenta. More

Smooth and Creamy Polenta

There are a lot of rules people say you need to follow to make polenta, like using a wooden spoon, stirring in only one direction, adding the polenta to boiling water, and stirring constantly. Forget those. What's really important is using the right ratio of liquid to cornmeal and cooking the polenta long enough for the cornmeal to properly hydrate and cook. More

Ricotta Gnocchi With Asparagus and Prosciutto

Fresh ricotta gnocchi may be the fastest fresh-pasta recipe I know. With a little practice, I've gotten it down to under ten minutes (8 minutes 53 seconds, to be precise). But the great part about this recipe is that it serves as a suitable base for a huge variety of sauces and flavors. For instance, last week a friend of mine brought over some delicious first-of-the-season fresh asparagus which we combined with prosciutto and an easy cream sauce to make a delicious impromptu (and fast!) meal on the spot. More

Light and Tender Potato Gnocchi With Sage-Butter Sauce

We're not going to lie: Potato gnocchi can be a little tricky and require some practice to get right. But if you know a few basic rules, it's really not that hard to make ones that are light and tender, not leaden and gummy. This recipe walks you through those steps, starting with choosing a gnocchi-friendly potato and cooking it the right way; then we leave it up to you whether to add egg yolk or not (yolks make a dough that's easier to work with, but also firmer); and finally we add just enough flour to make a cohesive dough while being careful not to overwork it to the point of gumminess. The result are lovely little gnocchi in a sage-butter sauce that will prove that good gnocchi aren't out of reach. More

Roman Semolina Gnocchi (Gnocchi alla Romana)

Long before ships brought native crops from the Americas to Europe, Italy was a land without red sauce, corn polenta, or potato gnocchi. But even without the potato, gnocchi still existed, such as in the form of the classic gnocchi alla Romana, this custardy oven-baked version made with semolina, egg, cheese, and butter. You could say these are the OG: the original gnocchi. More

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