'French' on Serious Eats

Classic Cherry Clafoutis

With its fancy French name and beautiful appearance when fresh from the oven, a classic cherry clafoutis is bound to impress guests. Little do they know just how easy it is to make—just whip up a simple batter with egg, milk, sugar, and flour, then pour it onto some cherries and bake. More

Foolproof Béarnaise Sauce

For my money, the very best classic steak sauce you can make at home, a sauce that will wow your guests with its flavor and elegance, and—most importantly—a sauce that can be made start to finish in under half an hour, is béarnaise. The catch (there's always a catch) is that made with the classic technique, it's very easy to mess up. Here is a foolproof technique that uses hot butter and a hand blender for perfect results every time. More

Roasted Chicken With Classic or Curry Soubise (Onion Sauce)

Soubise, an old-school French sauce classically made by pureeing softened onions with bechamel, is a great pairing for all sorts of roasted meats, like the roast chicken here. In this more modern version, it's simplified and lightened by using cream in place of the bechamel, then flavored with curry powder or vadouvan, a French variation on curry powder with garlic and shallots. More

Bar-Style Tarte Flambée (Alsatian Pizza With Fresh Cheese, Onions, and Bacon)

It looks like a pizza, it cooks like a pizza, but don't make the mistake of actually thinking it's a pizza. Tarte flambée, the Alsatian flatbread topped with fromage blanc (a fresh, tart, spreadable cheese), thinly sliced raw onions and bacon, is as Franco-Germanic in flavor as can be. This method delivers a bar-style tart, cooked on a flour tortilla in a cast iron skillet, then browned under the broiler. It has a thin, cracker-like crust that is irresistible. More

Classic Tarte Flambée (Alsatian Pizza With Fresh Cheese, Onions, and Bacon)

It looks like a pizza, it cooks like a pizza, but don't make the mistake of actually thinking it's a pizza. Tarte flambée, the Alsatian flatbread topped with fromage blanc (a fresh, tart, spreadable cheese), thinly sliced raw onions and bacon, is as Franco-Germanic in flavor as can be. This method delivers a classic tart, made on pizza dough rolled very thinly and cooked on a blazing hot Baking Steel or pizza stone right under the broiler. More

French Melt (Grilled Cheese With Caramelized Onion and Comté)

Want to impress your dinner date? Whip up a couple of French Melts. That's a big ol' pile of sweet, caramelized onions (see here for an easy technique to speed up the process) melted with a fat slab of Comté cheese. It's like French onion soup in an easy-to-pick-up, extra-buttery package. Set the table cloth and pull out the fine china, dear, tonight I'm wearing pants to the table! More

Coq au Vin (Chicken Braised in Red Wine)

A lot of coq au vin recipes have you braise the bird for hours. That's fine when you're doing it the traditional way with a tough old rooster, but it doesn't work well for the tender roasting hens most of us use today. This recipe delivers a rich and deeply braise with red wine, mushrooms, lardons, and onions that tastes like it was in the oven all day, except that it wasn't. More

Mussels with Fennel-Saffron Broth

I've gone on record as saying that mussels are the easiest choose-your-own-adventure one-pot meal around, and I intend to prove it to you. This version uses my standard steamed mussel technique and combines it with the classic flavors of a French bouillabaisse. Fennel, saffron, and tomatoes are cooked together with a little pastis and orange zest to form an aromatic, briny broth for dipping bread into. More

Traditional French Cassoulet

The first time I had cassoulet in its home turf it was a revelation. This loose, almost soup-like stew of beans and meat was so far removed from all versions of cassoulet I'd had in the United States, or even in other parts of France. It was a large, bubbling vat of beans and meat, covered in a crust so dark that it was almost black. Rich, meaty, and overwhelmingly simple, the main flavor was just that of the cured meat, a good stock, and beans. More

Endive, Shallot, and Goat Cheese Tart

If you only know endive as a crunchy, leafy, bitter green, then you've been missing out. Roasted, grilled, or sautéed, the wide-leafed vegetable loses much of its trademark bitterness, allowing its sweet, faintly earthy character to emerge at full force. Here, it's combined with shallots and goat cheese for a rich, buttery quiche-like tart. More

Iced Yogurt With Mead-Baked Peach From 'Paris Pastry Club'

When fruit is at its peak, it's best served simply; something that Paris Pastry Club author Fanny Zanotti knows well. This recipe for mead-baked peaches comes from a childhood memory of picking peaches in an orchard, and having them prepared just this way for dessert. The tangy yogurt is a lovely counterpoint to the soft, yielding flesh of the peaches. Crunchy honeycomb candy echoes the notes of honey in the mead, and provides a pleasant crunch. More

Piperade From 'Buvette: The Pleasure of Good Food'

Imagine waking up, head throbbing, room spinning, stomach growling. Too. Much. Wine. Waiting in the kitchen, left by some benevolent fantasy akin to the Easter Bunny or Tooth Fairy, is a pan steaming with silky, slightly caramelized peppers and onions, crumbles of spicy chorizo, and golden, life-giving eggs. This is Jody Williams' Piperade from her book, Buvette: The Pleasure of Good Food. More

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