'Chinese' on Serious Eats

Hot and Numbing Sichuan Chicken Salad (Bang Bang Ji Si)

Whether you call it Bang Bang Chicken (named after the sound that a pounding mallet makes when tenderizing the tough chicken breasts of yesteryear) or Mysterious Flavor Chicken, this classic cold Sichuan chicken salad dressed with Sichuan peppercorns, garlic, sesame, and chili oil, can be updated using a few modern techniques. Cooking the chicken breasts directly in a bag with aromatics guarantees ultra-moist and flavor-packed chicken without the need for any banging at all. More

Pretzel Bao With Sweet Sesame-Hot Mustard Pork

German-Chinese fusion may sound strange, but when pillowy pretzel buns meet bao, and mustard-slathered roasted pork meats char siu, it works. Chinese hot mustard, sesame paste, and honey make a flavor-packed change-up from the traditional char siu sauce, while a special Chinese bread-making trick makes the pretzel buns even more moist and tender. It's impossible not to love this Deutsch version of a Dim Sum classic. More

Spicy Cumin Lamb Skewers (Yang Rou Chuan)

Travel around the world and you'll find a different kind of skewered, fire-roasted meat wherever you go. On the streets of Beijing, you'll spot these spicy lamb skewers coated in cumin and chili flakes. But there's no need to go to China just to have them—you can make them right in your own yard on the grill. Here's how. More

Singapore Noodles

It's not entirely clear where Singapore noodles—the stir-fried curried rice noodles with shrimp, pork, and vegetables—come from, though it's unlikely Singapore is the source. Regardless, they're a stir-fry classic, and are easy to make at home. Here's what you need to know, from how to choose the right rice noodles to how to make the stir-fry work on a home burner. More

Cashew Chicken Ding With Jicama, Celery, and Red Bell Pepper

A ding dish is any Chinese stir-fry in which the chicken and vegetables are diced into little cubes, and crunchy ingredients like nuts are added for texture. Kung Pao Chicken is perhaps the best known example, but Cashew Chicken Ding isn't far behind. In this version, the chicken is stir-fried with mushrooms, jicama, celery, bell pepper, and cashews. More

Buddha's Delight (Lo Hon Jai): Chinese Vegetarian Stir-Fry

Tired of the same old vegetarian stir fry? Buddha's Delight is just what you need. A celebratory mixture of multiple vegetables and protein sources (wheat gluten, bean-curd skin, bean-curd puffs, and more), noodles, and a flavorful sauce infused with mushrooms, it's a reminder that vegetarian stir-fries don't have to be the same old ho-hum dish every time. More

Sheng Jian Bao (Pan-fried Pork Soup Dumplings)

Xiao long bao, Shanghai-style soup dumplings, have become legendary for good reason, but so far their doughier pan-fried cousins called sheng jian bao remain much less well-known here in the States. If you love XLB, you need to try sheng jian bao. Here's how to make them, from the flavorful pork filling to the dough wrapper and combo pan-frying and steaming method. More

Chinese Sticky Rice Wrapped in Lotus Leaf (Lo Mai Gai)

Lo mai gai, the dim sum classic of steamed lotus leaves stuffed with sticky rice and all sorts of delicious goodies, are irresistible from the moment you unwrap one fresh from the steamer and a chorus of aromas hits your nose. The biggest task is gathering all the ingredients, like the lotus leaves and glutinous rice, as well as Chinese sausage, cured pork belly, and salted egg yolks. Once you've got them rounded up, though, it's a relatively easy and extremely delicious at-home dish. More

Stir-Fried Beef With Chinese Broccoli

Beef with broccoli is a staple of North American Chinese fast food joints, but the real version of this dish uses Chinese broccoli (gai lan), not the broccoli florets you might be more accustomed to. Gai lan is mildly bitter, with tender leafy sections and juicy stalks, and it pairs perfectly with the strips of marinated beef, shallots, garlic, and oyster sauce. More

Black Bean Dipping Sauce With Maple Syrup

Chinese fermented black soy beans are eye-bulgingly salty and all kinds of funky. Here, its fermented tang is transformed into a delicious dipping sauce with the help of maple syrup, creamy peanut butter, and a little chili oil for some warm heat. It's perfect as a dip for dumplings, and is also delicious with roasted chicken and seared pork chops. More

Mushrooms and Tofu With Chinese Mustard Greens

Every year, families celebrate the Chinese Lunar New Year with an impressive feast called Reunion Dinner, and among the many plates on the table is abalone in a rich sauce with dried oysters, shiitakes, and an algae called black moss. Inspired by that dish, this recipe is a vegetarian take with easier-to-find ingredients, like tofu and both fresh and dried mushrooms. Even without the seafood it still delivers on the richness and flavor of the original. More

Chinese Steamed Whole Fish With Fermented Black Beans and Garlic

Food served during the Chinese Lunar New Year is full of significance, and one of the most important dishes is a whole fish. It symbolizes plentiful prosperity for this year and the next. It's also one of the most simple dishes to make. Here, it's steamed, then topped with fermented black beans, garlic, chili flakes, cilantro and ginger for plenty of fresh, deep flavor. More

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