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Rachel Allen's Brown Soda Bread

Kate Williams 3 comments

You can't have an Irish feast without at least one loaf of soda bread, and this one gets a hefty dose of whole wheat flour, a touch of butter, and some mixed seeds. This quick bread is a winner. More

Rachel Allen's Brown Soda Bread

Serious Eats Kate Williams Post a comment

For many years, I assumed that Irish soda bread always meant a slightly sweet, caraway and currant laced bread easily mistaken for a giant muffin. Frankly, I never liked this version of the quick bread, much preferring to eat "real bread" with my soup. It's a good thing I was mistaken about the scope of soda breads. Most of these loaves, like those featured in Rachel's Irish Family Food, are a much simpler (and more appealing) combination of flour, baking soda, and buttermilk. Rachel Allen's brown soda bread adds a bit more oomph with a hefty dose of whole wheat flour, a couple tablespoons of mixed seeds, and just a touch of butter. The resulting bread is an exemplary accompaniment to any number of soups, pickles, marmalades, or a generous swipe of butter. More

Rachel Allen's Irish Stew

Kate Williams 3 comments

As Rachel Allen explains in her new book, Rachel's Irish Family Food, there is no definitive recipe for Irish stew. The meat and vegetable stew is often a household specialty with its own family tricks and tweaks. Allen's take is a no-frills version with a short ingredient list. Her technique, however, builds a good amount of flavor and body with so few components: She picks bone-in lamb shoulder chops for the bulk of the stew, which contributes extra body to the broth and keeps the lamb succulent. In addition to browning the chops, Allen also browns the vegetables to build extra fond and give the usually wan roots more color. The stew is finished with a generous sprinkling of both chives and parsley to give a final burst of freshness. More

Rachel Allen's Irish Stew

Serious Eats Kate Williams Post a comment

As Rachel Allen explains in her new book, Rachel's Irish Family Food, there is no definitive recipe for Irish stew. The meat and vegetable stew is often a household specialty with its own family tricks and tweaks. Allen's take is a no-frills version with a short ingredient list. Her technique, however, builds a good amount of flavor and body with so few components: She picks bone-in lamb shoulder chops for the bulk of the stew, which contributes extra body to the broth and keeps the lamb succulent. In addition to browning the chops, Allen also browns the vegetables to build extra fond and give the usually wan roots more color. The stew is finished with a generous sprinkling of both chives and parsley to give a final burst of freshness. More

Rachel Allen's Mussels with Garlic and Bread Crumbs

Kate Williams Post a comment

According to Rachel Allen, mussels with bread crumbs were immensely popular in Ireland back in the 1980s. Yet their retro appeal holds true today and her version in Rachel's Irish Family Food is anything but kitschy. Plump, just-steamed mussels get a quick trip under a hot broiler topped with super buttery bread crumbs laced with garlic and parsley. The final result is a briny, succulent bite, colorful and rich. More

Rachel Allen's Mussels with Garlic and Bread Crumbs

Serious Eats Kate Williams Post a comment

According to Rachel Allen, mussels with bread crumbs were immensely popular in Ireland back in the 1980s. Yet their retro appeal holds true today and her version in Rachel's Irish Family Food, is anything but kitschy. In it, plump, just-steamed mussels get a quick trip under a hot broiler topped with super buttery breadcrumbs laced with garlic and parsley. The final result is a briny, succulent bite, colorful and rich. More

Rachel Allen's Homemade Pork Sausages with Colcannon and Applesauce

Kate Williams 14 comments

I'll admit it: I have a hard time saying the name "bangers and mash." It comes in a close second to that other British speciality, "spotted dick," in the list of foods I can't even begin to picture without giggling. Yet Rachel Allen's take on bangers and mash in her new book Rachel's Irish Family Food is sophisticated enough to warrant my serious attention. More

Cook the Book: 'Rachel's Irish Family Food'

Kate Williams Closed

With St. Patrick's Day around the corner, we're turning to Rachel Allen, BBC's "Irish Cooking Queen." Think of her as the Nigella Lawson of Ireland. This week we'll be cooking from her new cookbook, Rachel's Irish Family Food. Enter to win your copy here! More

Rachel Allen's Homemade Pork Sausages with Colcannon and Applesauce

Serious Eats Kate Williams Post a comment

I'll admit it: I have a hard time saying the name "bangers and mash." It comes in a close second to that other British speciality, "spotted dick," in the list of foods I can't even begin to picture without giggling. Yet Rachel Allen's take on bangers and mash in her new book Rachel's Irish Family Food is sophisticated enough to warrant my serious attention. Her simple pork sausages are bound lightly with egg, bread crumbs, and a bit of garlic and parsley to season. Instead of going through with the trouble of casing the mixture, she simply rolls them into small, breakfast-sized links and gives them a slow brown on the stovetop. And in lieu of ordinary potatoes to serve alongside, Allen advocates for a verdant colcannon mash made velvety soft green cabbage buttery mashed russets. A dollop of quick stovetop applesauce adds a contrasting sweet-tart tang to each bite. More

Shows We're Watching: Rachel Allen Bake! on the Cooking Channel

Leah Douglas 11 comments

Last week the much-awaited Cooking Channel launched, and along with this new network comes a whole slew of new shows and stars. We thought we'd introduce you to some of our favorite new shows, starting with Rachel Allen: Bake! Rachel Allen has actually already been a cooking show host for some time on BBC, not to mention her work as a food writer and cooking instructor at a culinary school in Cork, Ireland. The premise of her new Cooking Channel show is easy, approachable baking. Though charmed by Allen's gentle Irish accent and pretty smile, I was hoping she would take this mainstream baking show concept to a higher level. More

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