'pastis' on Serious Eats

The 5 Best Non-Wine Drinks I Drank in Provence

To many American drinkers, Provence is synonymous with wine, but this romantic region of Southern France holds so much more, from sweet black currant liqueur drinks to complex grape brandy. It's not that you shouldn't lap up the local rosés with your duck breast salad, but when you're on vacation in Southern France, there's so much more to tempt you into a mid-afternoon aperitif beyond the bottles that regularly make it across the pond. More

DIY vs. Buy: How to Make Pastis

One sure-fire way to start an argument with me is to say that absinthe makes people hallucinate. It doesn't. But if you think it does, you have something in common with French regulators in the early 1900s. Back then, everyone was panicking that absinthe would drive people insane because it contained wormwood. Before more people could succumb to absinthe madness and chop their ear off à la Vincent van Gogh, they outlawed the spirit. (The fact that absinthe was 140 proof and people were drinking it like wine had more than a little to do with the crazy behavior, but I digress.) With absinthe out of the picture, people needed another delicious anise-flavored alcoholic beverage. That's where pastis came in. More

DIY Pastis

Pastis is an anise-flavored aperitif that's one of life's little luxuries, and you can make a richly flavored homemade version by steeping some spices and bark in a jar for just a few days. More

In The Midnight Hour: Pastis

Pastis is one of New York's legendary mob scenes (the crowded kind, not the Mafia kind). The restaurant, Keith McNally's follow-up to Soho's iconic Balthazar, is a legend in its own right—the kind of eatery that seems to anchor a neighborhood. Were it not for McNally (and of course Florent), the Meatpacking District would not be what it is today. Breakfasts and brunches command lengthy waits, and on weekends, you're lucky to get a seat at the bar after midnight. More

Time for a Drink: Corpse Reviver #2

Enter the Corpse Reviver #2. Part of a class of "corpse reviver" cocktails—so named because of their purported ability to bring the dead (or at least painfully hungover) back to some semblance of life—this drink was a staple of bar manuals back in the 1930s, only to fall off the map in the last half of the 20th century. More

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