'pasties' on Serious Eats

British Bites: Beef and Stilton Pasty

Based on the large version of this classic pie, these savory pasties make a great light lunch, or even a hearty snack. The combination of beef and stilton is perfect for this time of year—salty and savory and great for colder weather. This recipe calls for just 1/4 cup of stout, which adds a light malty quality to the filling. But you can try another sort of beer, or even substitute stock if you'd rather drink your beer. More

Beef and Stilton Pasty

Based on the large version of this classic pie, these savory pasties make a great light lunch, or even a hearty snack. The combination of beef and stilton is perfect for this time of year—salty and savory and great for colder weather. This recipe calls for just 1/4 cup of stout, which adds a light malty quality to the filling. But you can try another sort of beer, or even substitute stock if you'd rather drink your beer. More

Sunday Brunch: Cornish Pasty

Cornwall's contribution to the world of meat pastries is a simple hand-pie filled with meat and root vegetables. Although the Cornish Pasty Association has strict rules regarding what exactly can go in an official Cornish pasty (beef, turnip, potato and onion), on this side of the pond it's safe to add a few extra ingredients other than the essentials. Traditionally, this pie is meant to eat standing on a lunch break, but add a pot of tea or some strong ale and light green salad and these humble pasties can be the cornerstone of an excellent brunch. More

Cornish Pasty

Cornwall's contribution to the world of meat pastries is a simple hand pie filled with meat and root vegetables. Although the Cornish Pasty Association has strict rules regarding what exactly can go in an official Cornish pasty (beef, turnip, potato and onion), on this side of the pond it's safe to add a few extra ingredients other than the essentials. Traditionally, this pie is meant to eat standing on a lunch break, but add a pot of tea or some strong ale and light green salad and these humble pasties can be the cornerstone of an excellent brunch. More

Cook the Book: Chicken and Leek Pasties

Taking a cue from Cornish pasties (know in West Cornish dialect as tiddy oggy (!), these are little moon-shaped handheld pastries filled with savory ingredients. Hugh Fearnley-Whittingstall offers up three filling variations in River Cottage Every Day—leftover stew, lentil and squash, and chicken and leek. More

'The Economist' Sends a Package Full of Pasties (Not Pastries)

The Economist sent a pasty, not a pastry, to Freakonomics writer Stephen Dubner. Freaknomics writer and blogger Stephen Dubner thought he noted a spelling slip in a recent Economist piece: "In the hills north east of Mexico City it is not uncommon to find Cornish pasties for sale." To Dubner, pastry without an "r" meant small, strategic coverings for a female chest, not savory pockets full of meat and veggies. Turns out The Economist was referring to the edible kind of pasties, not those in the lingerie section. Dubner's gotcha moment was in turn gotcha'd by the magazine, who FedEx'd him a pasty stuffed with peas, carrots, potatoes and mystery meat. Though he doesn't normally gobble down food from... More

Cooking with Kids: Cornish Pasties

"Giving your children the right amount of the heart-healthy oils is just as important as keeping them from eating lard." —Missy Chase Lapine, from 'The Sneaky Chef' That's funny, because in preparation for Thanksgiving, I just sent my wife and daughter to pick up some leaf lard. We buy our lard from a local farm, Skagit River Ranch. It's certified organic and, if you care about this sort of thing, loaded with the exact same monounsaturated fat found in Lapine's beloved olive and canola oils. More important, Skagit's lard is of superb quality, elevates every food it touches, and is essential to the centerpiece of our Thanksgiving table: Cornish pasties. Why pasties? My wife, Laurie, traces her roots to Penzance,... More

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