'panzanella' on Serious Eats

When Vietnamese Sandwiches and Italian Bread Salads Combine: Banh Mi Panzanella

When life hands you stale banh mi baguettes, you really can't make lemonade. Instead, make this banh mi bread salad that's inspired by panzanella, the classic Tuscan dish designed to transform stale bread into a delicious meal, but using banh mi flavors instead. In fact, you don't even need stale bread to make this: Just buy fresh bread and dry it in the oven. More

Banh Mi Panzanella

The classic flavors of Vietnamese banh mi sandwiches are reworked into the form of Italian panzanella, a salad designed to make stale bread delicious again. This version features pickled and fresh vegetables, lemongrass-marinated tofu, and two sauces that deliver spicy, sweet, and savory flavors. More

Roast Chicken With Asparagus Panzanella

Making panzanella— the classic Tuscan tomato-and-bread salad—without tomatoes is tricky, because you need all those juices to soften the stale bread. The trick is to find other ways to make the dish as flavor-packed and moist as possible. Here's our method with asparagus, cucumbers, and red onions, served alongside roast chicken. More

Yellow Bell Pepper Panzanella from 'Family Table'

There's nothing like the first bite of a sweet-tart, chewy-crunchy, tomato-rich panzanella in the middle of the summer—except of course that moment when you realize that bread salads can be made sans tomato, all months of the year. After all, the beauty of panzanella is that you get to eat tons of bread and still call it a salad, right? More

Yellow Bell Pepper Panzanella from 'Family Table'

There's nothing like the first bite of a sweet-tart, chewy-crunchy, tomato-rich panzanella in the middle of the summer--except of course that moment when you realize that bread salads can be made sans tomato, all months of the year. After all, the beauty of panzanella is that you get to eat tons of bread and still call it a "healthy" salad, right? The Yellow Bell Pepper Panzanella in Michael Romano and Karen Stabiner's Family Table is a prime example of the form. Made mostly of caramelized onions and bell peppers, this panzanella has all of the vibrancy of the original without running the risk of eating a mealy tomato. Capers and a generous amount of torn basil are key to perking up the rich sweetness of the vegetables. More

Seared Panzanella Chicken from 'Portland, Oregon Chef's Table'

Roost's Seared Panzanella Chicken stood out amongst the rest of the poultry recipes in Portland, Oregon Chef's Table for its rustic restraint. The chicken is simply seared skin-side down and finished in the oven. The panzanella component is no more than caramelized garlic, oil-cured olives, toasted bread, parsley, and chicken jus. Each plate is finished with a whiff of arugula salad and a drizzle of extra jus. Nothing more, nothing less. More

Seared Panzanella Chicken from 'Portland, Oregon Chef's Table'

Roost's Seared Panzanella Chicken stood out amongst the rest of the poultry recipes in Portland, Oregon Chef's Table for its rustic restraint. The chicken is simply seared skin-side down and finished in the oven. The panzanella component is no more than caramelized garlic, oil-cured olives, toasted bread, parsley, and chicken jus. Each plate is finished with a whiff of arugula salad and a drizzle of extra jus. Nothing more, nothing less. More

Grilled Cheese Curd Panzanella

If any one dish symbolizes the glory and versatility of summer tomatoes, I'd place my vote with panzanella. The Italian classic needs nothing more than some stale bread, a few pantry staples, and a load of tomatoes to make an incredible dish, even if it's not much of a meal. But could it stand up on its own? I looked to cheese curds for the answer. More

The Food Lab's Asparagus Week, Day 5: Grilled Asparagus, Zucchini, and Bread Salad with Olive-Caper Dressing

I love a good classic panzanella—stale bread tossed with fresh ripe tomatoes, olive oil, and perhaps some basil and vinegar. That is, I love it during tomato season when I have access to completely fresh-off-the-vine, summer-ripe tomatoes. Any other time of the year, panzanella can go over to the corner and suck it. There are, thankfully, other things available this time of year that can be used to riff on the same concept. Asparagus comes to mind. More

Grilled Panzanella Salad

There's many ways to deal with day-old bread. Grind it into bread crumbs for your mac and cheese, soak it in custard and bourbon for bread pudding, stuff your turkey with it, or if all else fails, just do what I do and use it up in your homemade dog food. But right now—early fall—is about the best time of the year to make panzanella. The classic Northern Italian salad of day-old bread and tomatoes is best at this time of year, when the last tomatoes of the summer have ripened beyond capacity and are splitting open with excess juice. More

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