'noodle' on Serious Eats

Shredded Chicken With Soba and Miso-Butter Sauce

I think there should be a t-shirt or sign that reads: Miso butter just makes it all better. Not soba noodles, shredded chicken, and crunchy vegetables come together in one pot. It take half an hour to make from start to finish, but it'll only take a fraction of that time to slurp it all up whether you use chopsticks or forks. More

Salmon in a Sea of Coconut From 'Marcus Off Duty'

Marcus Samuelsson is downright obliged to love salmon, having grown up on the coast of Sweden. And he has a thing for the flavors of Southeast Asia, choosing the foods of that region to be his desert-island pick, so to speak. In this dish from his new cookbook. Marcus Off Duty, he combines both cuisines into one weird and weirdly wonderful bowl. More

Quick Kimchi Ramen With Shiitake Mushrooms and Soft-Cooked Egg

Making real-deal ramen is a lengthy project that requires planning in advance. But there are days when you just want a delicious bowl of it, without the fuss. This easy Korean-style kimchi ramen is for those times. It's loaded with flavor, but takes less than an hour to throw together, thanks to several umami-rich ingredients and a cool baking-soda trick that turns angel-hair pasta into ramen-like noodles. More

The Food Lab: Make Your Own Just-Add-Hot-Water Instant Noodles (and Make Your Coworkers Jealous)

Despite all of the pleasures of instant noodles—the salty, MSG-packed broth, the little freeze-dried nubs of vegetables, the slippery, way-too-soft noodles—wouldn't it be great if you could get all of that same convenience and pleasure—the portability, the just-add-water cooking, the lunch-sized portions—but pack it full of fresh vegetables and real, honest-to-goodness flavor? Here's a secret: you can, and it's easier than you think. More

The Food Lab Turbo: How to Make Lighter Tuna Noodle Casserole With Just One Pan (and No Knives!)

Pasta with a light and creamy sauce, tender chunks of tuna, and peas, in about 15 minutes start to finish. This is the kind of recipe that I wish I'd known in college. All it takes is a single large skillet or pot, one burner or hot plate, a bowl, and a fork. That's it. And on top of that, it turns out a dish that's not just good-given-the-constraints, but legitimately good-enough-that-I-would've-made-it-for-that-girl-I-was-trying-to-impress-in-college or even good-enough-for-a-mildly-romantic-weeknight-dinner-with-the-wife. More

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