'jewish' on Serious Eats

Lemon-Marinated Tuscan-Jewish Fried Chicken

Tuscany and fried chicken: two things that are almost universally loved, but otherwise have very little to do with each other. Or do they? Turns out there's an awesome fried chicken dish that comes to us straight from the Jewish community of Tuscany, featuring meat that's brined in lemon juice with garlic and spices, then fried in a simple coating of flour and egg. More

Why the Knish Became New York's Miss Congeniality

"People used to say, 'the streets in New York are paved in gold,'" Laura Silver said to me over the phone. "No they're not. They're paved in knishes." Born in Brooklyn and bred in Queens, Silver is the world's leading authority on the knish, and she knows just how vital it is to Jews'—and New Yorkers'—culinary heritage, even if everyone else forgets about the poor thing. More

Leah Koenig on the Best Jewish Cookbooks and What People Get Wrong About Jewish Cuisine

"I'm honestly so bored of the, 'Oh my mother's potato kugel was as hard as a rock,' jokes that people make to sort of dismiss the entire category of Jewish food. That's not because potato kugel is inherently bad, it's because your mom didn't make a good one. Taken from a global perspective, Jewish cuisine—which can mean everything from knishes and brisket to smoky, charred eggplant and fried artichokes—is incredibly vibrant and adaptable," says Leah Koenig, the author of Modern Jewish Cooking. More

Raw Root Vegetable Salad From 'Joy of Kosher'

Root vegetables may be most often eaten in the coldest depths of winter, but I actually like them best in early spring. New carrots and radishes are a sweet counterpoint to wintered beets, breathing new life into the tired roots. Add a burst of anise-y fennel and a smattering of chopped nuts, as Jamie Geller does in her new cookbook Joy of Kosher, and you'll have a brilliantly elegant and healthy side dish. More

Raw Root Vegetable Salad From 'Joy of Kosher'

Root vegetables may be most often eaten in the coldest depths of winter, but I actually like them best in early spring. New carrots and radishes are a sweet counterpoint to wintered beets, breathing new life into the tired roots. Add a burst of anise-y fennel and a smattering of chopped nuts, as Jamie Geller does in her new cookbook Joy of Kosher, and you'll have a brilliantly elegant and healthy side dish. More

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