'india' on Serious Eats

Homeward Bound: Chef Floyd Cardoz Returns to India

What if you were given the chance to revisit the place that shaped your entire perception of food? North End Grill chef and Top Chef Masters winner Floyd Cardoz did just that, returning to Goa, India, where he visited his great-grandmother every summer before emigrating to the United States 25 years ago. Here, he shares both his snapshots and his impressions of India's rapidly evolving food culture today. More

Thums Up for Indian Cola

Rather than go head to head with the marketing machines of the big boys, the Parle group sold Thums Up to Coca-Cola in 1990. The labels of the two colas might seem similar, but Coca-Cola Classic and Thums Up do actually have quite distinct flavor profiles. More

Video: A Day in the Life of a Dabbawalla Delivering Lunches in Mumbai

Each day in Mumbai, a group of men called Dabbawallas transport 175,000 homemade lunches from Indian homes to their family members' offices. They carry the tiffens ("lunch containers") on their heads, on bicycles, on trains and even across the tracks to get to the offices where husbands and sons of the ladies who prepared the food are awaiting lunch. Despite the various modes of transport, the lunches always arrive on time. More

Video: 'We Must Practice Non-Violent Farming'

"Soil possesses such importance, that without it, life is impossible. In one spoon of soil, there are billions of lives," says farmer/philosopher Bhaskar Save in this video. We spent two days with him in India, being inspired by his beautiful philosophy. He believes farming should be done with non-violence. That means no tilling, no pesticides, no meat. More

3 Indian Spirits You Should Know

My knowledge of alcohol from India has so far been limited to Kingfisher beer, which quells the spice from Vindaloo at my local Indian restaurant, and Amrut Fusion, a tasty whiskey made with Indian and Scottish barley. But my lack of knowledge isn't because I don't venture out from sips I'm already familiar with. As I learned from the seminar on Indian spirits at last week's Tales of the Cocktail in New Orleans, it's because only half of local Indian spirits find their way out of the states they're produced, let alone to the United States. More

Snapshots from India: The Best Vegetarian Street Food

If you read a lot of Indian novels, you'll know that people sometimes use "veg" and "nonveg" as shorthand for "tame" and "sexy," respectively. But as we ate our way across Mumbai, through Rajasthan, and into central India, we discovered that when it came to food, the opposite was true. The vegetarian fare we ate was so much better, so much fresher, and so much more interesting than the nonvegetarian offerings. Here are some highlights from a month of eating around India: chaat, pakoras, samosas, papad, and more. More

Tea Time: All About Darjeeling Tea

Though the tea-growing lands of India are (for better or worse) synonymous with household teabag brands nowadays, tea is still a relative newcomer to that fertile part of East Asia. Darjeeling tea, which has found a foothold in both the highest- and lowest-brows of the tea-drinking market, only began to spring from the Himalayan soils of West Bengal, India, in the later half of the 1800s, at the hand—yup—of a seed-smuggler just back from a trip to China. More

Tea Time: All About Assam Tea

From the most tea-producing region in the most tea-producing country in the world comes Assam tea, a sultry, malty black tea among India's most famous. Discovered in the early 1800s growing wild in the tropically warm and wet Assam region at the edge of the eastern Himalayan mountains, this indigenous tea is versatile enough to have been planted throughout Asia, proving extremely prolific, easy to grow, and able to be harvested frequently. More

School Lunch in India

In India, school lunches are usually provided by loving mothers, not school cafeterias! In fact, this love of home-cooked food has given rise to a unique type of food-service worker, known as the dabbawalla, or literally, "person with a box." What might one of these boxes hold for Indian schoolchildren? Find out! More

India Considers a Constitutional Right to Food

One of the most highly-populated regions on the planet, India has more than 400 million people living in poverty. This low standard of living presents many day-to-day difficulties to families, but one of the most pressing national issues is hunger. An inefficient government-sponsored food distribution program does little for the families who need assistance most. How to address this problem has become a topic of major political debate. At the center of reform-minded discussion is the president of the Congress Party, Sonia Gandhi. More

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