'how to' on Serious Eats

Boldly Go Where No Caprese Salad Has Gone Before: Fried Caprese Bombs

I decided to create a fried hybrid—a frybrid, if you will—of two of my favorite mozzarella-based appetizers: caprese salad and mozzarella sticks. The resulting Fried Caprese Bombs consist of mozzarella-filled mini tomatoes that are breadcrumbed, fried, and served with a balsamic reduction. Crispy outside, gooey inside, and slightly sweet, this is one appetizer you have to try. More

10-Minute Fresh Ricotta Gnocchi Get a Spring Makeover With Asparagus and Prosciutto

A few weeks back I showed you that you can make fresh ricotta gnocchi in less time than it takes to boil a pot of water. With a little practice, I've gotten it down to under ten minutes (8 minutes 53 seconds, to be precise). But the great part about this recipe is that it serves as a suitable base for a huge variety of sauces and flavors. For instance, last week a friend of mine brought over some delicious first-of-the-season fresh asparagus which we combined with prosciutto and an easy cream sauce to make a delicious impromptu (and fast!) meal on the spot. More

How to Make the Best Cashew Chicken at Home

You may not know it, but you've probably eaten a lot of ding in your life. Kung Pao Chicken? Ding! Cashew Chicken? Ding! Confused? Ding! Don't worry, we'll explain what ding is, and give you an awesome recipe for Cashew Chicken Ding with crunchy vegetables like jicama, celery, and bell pepper. More

How to Color Fresh Pasta

Fresh pasta is many things, but vibrantly hued is not one of them. There are times when this couldn't matter less—times when you're dousing it in a thick, colorful sauce or making uova in raviolo. But sometimes you want to keep things super simple without sacrificing an eye-catching presentation. And sometimes you just want some bright pink noodles, dammit. Here's how to make fresh pasta in a rainbow of colors. More

Why You Should Turn Your Taco Night Into Puffy Taco Night

Puffy tacos, a San Antonio specialty, are made from fresh masa that puffs and crisps in hot oil. The result is crisp outside and soft within, and way more fun that your standard hard taco shell. They can be stuffed with your favorite variety of taco-night fillings—this recipe uses a flavorful ground beef mixture that's earthy, spicy, and slightly smoky. More

The Best Way to Store Fresh Herbs

Take a look at those herbs above. The ones on the left look liked they were probably picked fresh just before I photographed them, while the ones at the right had been hanging out in my refrigerator for weeks in a forgotton plastic bag, right? Wrong. All of those stems of cilantro are the exact same age. 51 days in my refrigerator, to be exact. The only difference is in how they were stored. So what's the best way to store herbs? I tested out every method I could think of, isolating every variable—light, air, moisture, and temperature—and pushing my herbs to the limit to figure it out. More

The Food Lab: Why Chicken With Pan Sauce Is Always Better at Restaurants (and How to Make Yours Just as Good at Home)

It wasn't until I got my first gig cooking in restaurants that it really struck me exactly what a pan sauce is supposed to taste like: rich and smooth, glossy and brightly flavored, and leaving a streak of white plate that slowly closes as you swiped each bite through it. So what does a restaurant kitchen have that I was missing back home, and more importantly, how can you get the same results? Here's the answer. More

Dim Sum Classics: How to Make Sticky Rice Wrapped in Lotus Leaf (Lo Mai Gai)

Lo mai gai, the dim sum classic of steamed lotus leaves stuffed with sticky rice and all sorts of delicious goodies, are irresistible. The biggest task is gathering all the ingredients, like the lotus leaves and glutinous rice, as well as Chinese sausage, cured pork belly, and salted egg yolks. Once you've got them rounded up, though, it's a relatively easy and extremely delicious at-home dish. More

Freeze Fresh Herbs for Long-Term Storage

There's no herb storage method I know of that can faithfully retain the flavor and texture of completely fresh herbs, but if you find yourself with more than you can possibly use, there are some methods that will work better than others. So you want to have something that closely resembles fresh herbs for sauces, soups, and stews? In that case, the freezer is your friend. Here's the best way to freeze herbs for long-term storage. More

More Posts