'hiroko's american kitchen' on Serious Eats

Sukiyaki in an American Kitchen from 'Hiroko's American Kitchen'

Traditional sukiyaki is a hot pot-style dish of beef and vegetables simmered in a broth of soy sauce, sugar, and mirin. It's a popular meal in Japan, but because of the lack of tabletop cooking vessels in the US, sukiyaki is challenging to replicate here. Hiroko Shimbo's version in Hiroko's American Kitchen drops the hot pot entirely to create a one dish meal more suitable to the American home cook. More

Sukiyaki in an American Kitchen from 'Hiroko's American Kitchen'

Traditional sukiyaki is a hot pot-style dish of beef and vegetables simmered in a broth of soy sauce, sugar, and mirin. It's a popular meal in Japan, but because of the lack of tabletop cooking vessels in the US, sukiyaki is challenging to replicate here. Hiroko Shimbo's version in Hiroko's American Kitchen drops the hot pot entirely to create a one dish meal more suitable to the American home cook. More

Ramen with Chashu Pork from 'Hiroko's American Kitchen'

Like many big city serious eaters, I enjoy probably more than my fair share of ramen. Until this week, all of these sips and slurps were at restaurants or food trucks; even though I cook almost everything for myself, ramen has always seemed like a dish best left to experts with plenty of time to tend a long-simmered broth. However, when I opened up Hiroko Shimbo's new cookbook, Hiroko's American Kitchen, and saw not one, but two recipes for the noodle soup, I knew I needed to give it a shot. More

Ramen with Chashu Pork from 'Hiroko's American Kitchen'

Like many big city serious eaters, I enjoy probably more than my fair share of ramen. Until this week, all of these sips and slurps were at restaurants or food trucks; even though I cook almost everything for myself, ramen has always seemed like a dish best left to experts with plenty of time to tend a long-simmered broth. However, when I opened up Hiroko Shimbo's new cookbook, Hiroko's American Kitchen, and saw not one, but two recipes for the noodle soup, I knew I needed to give it a shot. More

Traditional Braised Daikon from 'Hiroko's American Kitchen'

Hiroko Shimbo's braised daikon recipe is one of the few strictly Japanese recipes in her new cookbook, Hiroko's American Kitchen. The dish is a simple appetizer of daikon "slowly bathed" in kelp stock and topped with Shimbo's spicy miso sauce. The sauce—a blend of aged miso, sugar, mirin, sake, lemon juice, and red pepper flakes—provides rich, tangy contrast to the subtle, earthy flavor of daikon. More

Traditional Braised Daikon from 'Hiroko's American Kitchen'

Hiroko Shimbo's braised daikon recipe is one of the few strictly Japanese recipes in her new cookbook, Hiroko's American Kitchen. The dish is a simple appetizer of daikon "slowly bathed" in kelp stock and topped with Shimbo's spicy miso sauce. The sauce—a blend of aged miso, sugar, mirin, sake, lemon juice, and red pepper flakes—provides rich, tangy contrast to the subtle, earthy flavor of daikon. More

Cook the Book: 'Hiroko's American Kitchen'

When you pick up most internationally focused cookbooks these days, you'll usually find a slew of foreign ingredients, cooking techniques, and flavors. Much of the focus is on teaching brand new skills and ideas to broaden the scope of American home kitchens. Cooking from these books requires a big shift in thinking as well as a major shopping trip for all kinds of new ingredients. There's nothing wrong with such culturally specific books, but sometimes a gentler transition between cuisines is welcome. Enter Hiroko Shimbo's new cookbook, Hiroko's American Kitchen. More

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