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Nigel Slater's Salad of Game, Grapes, and Verjuice

Kate Williams 3 comments

Grapes are no strangers in chicken salad, adding sweetness and a burst of freshness to what can often be a rich, heavy dish. In Ripe, Nigel Slater riffs on this combination in A Salad of Game, Grapes, and Verjuice, upping the salad's grape quotient by using verjuice—the juice of unripe grapes—in the vinaigrette dressing. More

Nigel Slater's Salad of Game, Grapes, and Verjuice

Serious Eats Kate Williams Post a comment

Grapes are no strangers in chicken salad, adding sweetness and a burst of freshness to what can often be a rich, heavy dish. In Ripe, Nigel Slater riffs on this combination in A Salad of Game, Grapes, and Verjuice, upping the salad's grape quotient by using verjuice—the juice of unripe grapes—in the vinaigrette dressing. More

Critic-Turned-Cook Gets Her Game (Meat) On

Leslie Kelly 6 comments

Alpha Sigma Phi Nick David making Sloppy Joes with moose meat. [Photographs: Leslie Kelly] Game is the new bacon. Well, maybe not yet. But if artisan farmers have become culinary superstars, can hunters be far behind? When I used to review restaurants, I was always drawn to exotic game meat—I've eaten elk, venison, antelope, alligator, pheasant, grouse and ostrich. (Still don't know why ostrich never took off; it tastes like steak and has a fraction of the fat.) I'm crazy about rabbit and would never say no to roast bear. Darlene Barnes, my boss at Alpha Sigma Phi, the frat at the University of Washington where I've been prep cooking since September, once again demonstrated her considerable chops last... More

Squirrel: The Eco-Friendly Meat du Jour?

Erin Zimmer 11 comments

Photograph from law_keven on Flickr Bushy-tailed and apparently low-fat, squirrels are the haute new mammal to find on dinner plates. According to the Guardian, hunters cannot shoot the American grey squirrel fast enough to keep up with demands. "Ugh, honey, squirrel again for dinner?" Yes, that phrase might become more popular as consumers discover the furry rodent's small carbon footprint and pleasant taste, hovering somewhere between lamb and duck. Available to many, squirrels have great environmental credentials given their minimal food miles. Ideally, you want the fattened-up ones from the countryside though, not the scrawny one scaling your backyard tree. Squirrel meat is already popular in the Deep South and referenced in older copies of The Joy of Cooking as... More

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