'farming' on Serious Eats

The Pros and Cons of Joining a CSA

The spring harvest is upon us, and in many communities, it's the last call to sign up for a CSA for the full growing season. But before making the leap and joining one, consider whether the program is right for you. There are many pros and cons to weigh, and the summer can be an unexpected time - for you and that farm. Here's a handy list of pros and cons about CSA as opposed to other modes of food-shopping. More

Video: 'We Must Practice Non-Violent Farming'

"Soil possesses such importance, that without it, life is impossible. In one spoon of soil, there are billions of lives," says farmer/philosopher Bhaskar Save in this video. We spent two days with him in India, being inspired by his beautiful philosophy. He believes farming should be done with non-violence. That means no tilling, no pesticides, no meat. More

Video: A San Diego Family's Backyard Chicken Story

A common critique of the locavore food movement is that it's elitist. In the case of Jason Ring, that couldn't be further from the truth. He raises chickens, goats and pigs to take some financial grocery pressure off his income. In his small backyard in San Diego, Jason provides a large portion of his family's food, as well as a fair share of their life lessons. More

Video: Herding Backyard Goats in Louisville, Kentucky

It's not often that you look at a suburban backyard to find a man herding goats, but that is what people in one neighborhood in Louisville experience every day. Burundian refugee Jean-Marie herds goats within the Louisville, Kentucky, city limits. He sells them to the growing immigrant and refugee population. Goat isn't yet popular with all Southerners, but it reminds Jean-Marie of his homeland. This video captures the day we spent with him and his family. More

Video: Janus Food Works in Oregon, Getting Youth Involved in Urban Agriculture

Janus Youth Programs has operated community-based programs for children, youth, and families in Oregon and Washington since 1972. They have a network of over 20 programs includes, including Janus Food Works, which employs 14 to 21 year-olds from Portland. The youth get involved in the planning, growing, selling, and donating of over 4,000 pounds of organic produce each year from the one-acre organic farm on Sauvie Island. More

Will Rainy Weather Affect 2012 Farm Bill Provisions?

Though small farms are suffering from poor weather conditions, large-scale agriculture is also vulnerable. Rain is the primary problem facing growers in the Midwest and Northeast, but severe drought is causing alarm in Texas and other southwestern states. Two main crops affected so far are corn and wheat, and both commodities' prices have gone up as a result. More

What You Should Know About the Farm Bill

In a few months, debates will begin of the 2012 Farm Bill, the enormous set of policies that details agricultural activity in the United States. Hearings for the Bill began nearly a year ago, with testimony from citizens and organizations who felt compelled to share their outlook on farm policy. Soon we will begin hearing much more about the cost, impact, and ethics of this bill. So, before the debates kick into high gear, how about a quick history lesson? More

Video: Bison Farming on Long Island

In the latest video from Food Curated, Liza de Guia meets Ed Tuccio, a farmer on the North Fork of Long Island who's been raising bison for over 30 years. He's part of a small movement of passionate farmers working to bring bison back. It's actually not a bad time to be a bison farmer. There's a growing demand for the meat and prices have doubled. After this taping, Liza polished off a bison burger and walked away thinking, why don't I eat this more often? More

Serious Reads: The Dirty Life, by Kristin Kimball

Once upon a time, Kristin Kimball was a freelance writer living the young person's lifestyle in New York: crappy apartment, lots of caffeine, and an oven used for sweater storage. Then one weekend she was sent to do a profile of a farmer in Pennsylvania. Mark lived in a trailer and worked the surrounded land with boundless energy—he was at once challenging, spontaneous, and overwhelmingly charming. The two began dating, in a whirlwind courtship that led to Mark proposing a move to New Paltz, New York. The two would start a farm. At times I found myself so moved by Kimball's narrative, I had to put the book down. More

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