'easy' on Serious Eats

Party-Sized Chicken Parmesan Sandwiches

To make the best chicken Parm sandwich, just start with the best chicken Parmesan. Our version uses a buttermilk brine for extra juiciness and flavor. We take the leftovers and pack them into a full-sized loaf of toasted ciabatta, adding some extra sauce and cheese to keep the bread moist before cutting it up into single serving slices. This is a chicken Parm sandwich so good it's almost worth making the chicken Parm fresh just for the sandwich. More

Cider-Braised Country-Style Pork Ribs With Creamy Mashed Potatoes

Containing a mix of light and dark meat, country-style pork ribs braise well, yielding tender meat that both flavors and absorbs the liquid they cook in. With that in mind, I built mine from rustically cut nubs of carrot, celery, onion and garlic, plus burnished tomato paste -- prepped in the same Dutch oven that's used to brown the pork. Then, the pan is deglazed with white wine, cider vinegar, chicken stock and apple cider and spiked with Dijon mustard and aromatics. After a time spent in a low oven, the whole shebang is served atop creamy mashed potatoes. More

Shrimp Scampi With Garlic, Red Pepper Flakes, and Herbs

To get the most flavor in this shrimp scampi, we use vermouth instead of white wine, and a mix of fragrant herbs—parsley, tarragon, and chives—instead of just parsley. The silky butter sauce, meanwhile, is brightened with a splash of fresh lemon juice and fresh lemon zest. It's a quick, easy, one-pot Italian-American classic with just enough extra flavor and flair to make it special. More

American Chop Suey (Macaroni, Beef, and Cheese Skillet Casserole)

Beefaroni, macaroni and beef, chili mac, Johnny Marzetti, or American chop suey, call it what you will, but whatever its origins, there's one thing for sure: the stuff is delicious. Tender pasta with a rich tomato and beef sauce flavored with garlic and oregano, cooked together with onions and peppers, and finished with cheese, this is Italian-American comfort food at its finest. Not only that, but it's a ridiculously easy dish to put together, cooked 100% on the stovetop, and requiring nothing more than a pot, a bowl, and about half an hour of your time. More

Quick and Easy Italian-American Red Sauce in 40 Minutes or Less

There are times when you can stand over the stove all day, slowly cooking that red sauce down. Then there are times when you need to put dinner on the table in under an hour. For those moments when convenience trumps patience, this is the red sauce to turn to. Simmered with plenty of garlic, dried oregano, red pepper flakes, and basil, this sauce can be whipped up in no time but still has that deep, rich, long-cooked flavor. More

A One-Pot Fish and Cheese Recipe (That Really Works!): Snapper With Brown Rice, Avocado, and Cheese

Yes. You read it right. Fish AND cheese. Cuz's, a fish shack I recently visited in Barbados, was the inspiration for this week's recipes. There, it was easy to enjoy a just-caught red snapper with a side of rice and beans and a healthy dose of local hot sauce. Back home, I decided to make my own twist on this local dish as a one-pot meal. More

Lighter Fettuccine Alfredo

Don't get me wrong—I'm not a health nut or calorie counter. But let's face it: the feeling you get after downing a bowl of creamy, cheesy Fettuccine Alfredo ain't the best. Wouldn't it be great to have a quick and easy version that has all the flavor of the cream-packed original, but with a cleaner flavor that doesn't leave you in a food coma? More

The Best Slow-Cooked Tomato Sauce

This rich and hearty red sauce tastes like it's been cooked for hours, because it has. The secret to rich, naturally sweet, complex flavors is to cook the sauce in the oven, allowing the surface to brown while the sauce slowly concentrates. The resultant sauce is great on pasta, with meatballs, on your chicken parm, or scooped right out of the pan with a spoon on its own. More

Singapore-Style Soft Cooked Eggs With Kaya Jam and Toast

For years, one of my favorite late night snacks has been a soft-cooked egg which I break into a bowl, drizzle with soy sauce and pepper, stir up, and slurp down as silently as possible in the dim light of the kitchen, trying not to wake my wife. I always thought I was a little weird in loving it so much. But then I found vindication in one of Singapore's staple breakfasts: kaya toast served with soft boiled eggs and strong coffee sweetened with sugar and evaporated milk (the soy sauce and pepper are added at your own discretion). More

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