'curacao' on Serious Eats

Kentucky Corpse Reviver from Peels

Perhaps you've had a Corpse Reviver #2, which brings together gin and curaçao, Lillet blanc, and lemon, with a dash of absinthe. Here's a variation from Peels restaurant in NYC that uses bourbon instead of gin, and it's delicious. Pierre Ferrand's dry curaçao is great here, but you could substitute Cointreau if you have it on hand. More

The Serious Eats Field Guide to Orange Liqueur

Orange liqueur has earned a bad reputation over the last few decades. Take, for example, curaçao. When many people think of curaçao, they immediately recall bright blue cocktails, sticky sweet and garish—drinks they might have had in college or even as recently as last weekend. Today we'll look at a range of orange liqueurs, from high-priced brandy-laced products to inexpensive triple secs. More

DIY vs. Buy: Should I Make My Own Triple Sec?

Orange liqueur, in one form or another, is easy to find at any liquor store. Grand Marnier is the only curaçao that I've liked so far, though Pierre Ferrand recently released an intriguing new version worth checking out. In the triple sec category, Combier and Patron Citronge are both good but are second choices next to Cointreau. The less-pricey brands tend to taste overly sweet with a harsh bite. They taste, in a word, cheap. A side-by-side comparison of homemade orange liqueur with a bottom-shelf triple sec is no contest—DIY wins it by a mile. More

Time for a Drink: the Bombay Cocktail

Here's a brandy-based classic that dates to at least 1930: the Bombay Cocktail. I first tasted this drink several months ago at Bar Agricole in San Francisco. Medium-bodied and full of flavor without coming on too aggressive, the Bombay Cocktail offers a glimpse at another time, when brandy was one of the regents of the cocktail kingdom. More

Time for a Drink: Falling Leaves

Created by New York mixological maestro Audrey Saunders, the Falling Leaves is a great autumn drink that works well as a conversation starter as guests arrive. Not only rich and flavorful, the Falling Leaves packs less of an alcoholic wallop than a typical cocktail, so you'll be able to enjoy your drink without throwing yourself off stride while putting the finishing touches on the meal--and maybe even mix a second round at halftime. More

Time for a Drink: Knickerbocker

The Knickerbocker dates to at least the 1860s, when it made its print debut in the first known bartending manual, penned by Jerry Thomas. The recipe called for "Santa Cruz rum," or rum from St. Croix in the Virgin Islands, along with lime juice and sweetener in the form of raspberry syrup and curacao, and garnished with berries in season. More

El Presidente

When the weather (or your palate) is being indecisive, it's best for your cocktails to play along. That's where the El Presidente comes in: made with light rum, it has a bright, summery appeal; but with the gravitas brought to the drink by dry vermouth and orange curacao, the flavor is ready to pull on a sweater against the evening's chill. More

Mai Tai

Spawned from the rum-soaked genius mind of "Trader Vic" Bergeron, the mai tai is one of the most regal refreshments in the exotic-drink universe. Originally made with 17-year-old Jamaican rum, imported French orgeat, Dutch curaçao and fresh-squeezed lime juice, the mai tai quickly became a phenomenon; it also quickly became perverted. More

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