'croissants' on Serious Eats

Sweet Technique: How to Make Croissants

The croissant (and its cousin, pain au chocolat) embodies of all the techniques I love most in the world of pastry. I find the lamination process, with its series of well-timed folds and turns, challenging, meditative and satisfying. And, on the other hand, I also respect the need for flexibility and the attention that must be paid to a yeasted dough, by adjusting for variables like ingredients and temperatures, for proper dough development and rise. I also love eating them. More

Croissants and Pain au Chocolat

Croissants, with their golden brown, crisp exterior and creamy, buttery interior, are always a welcome treat. To make them, you create a yeasted dough, into which you secure a sheet of butter. The flaky layers in the end product are the result of folding the dough many times, a process called lamination. From mixing and proofing, to laminating and resting and shaping, croissants are certainly not a quickie project, but with practice, the results can be amazing. More

Bake the Book: Croissants

To enjoy that delicately flaky French pastry known as a croissant, you have two options: Stopping by your local bakery and picking up a few, or the road less traveled—making them yourself. The difference between these two options is really a matter of time, the first taking just a few minutes, and the second, around 14 hours. While heading to the store is a good option for most of us, making croissants at home is a project for intrepid bakers, those who have a need to know just how all of those buttery layers come to be. More

Croissants

For all of you ambitious bakers out there who have been wondering just how the buttery layers of a croissant come to be, this recipe is for you. Harvard grad Joanne Chang has written a comprehensive recipe that will hold your hand from dough rolling to shaping to proudly pulling lovely, flaky croissants out of the oven. More

Bread Baking: Easy(er) Croissants

There may not be such a thing as croissants that are truly easy to make, but I guarantee these are easier than any of the more traditional recipes. This dough recipe is a cross between pie dough, sweet flaky pastry dough, and traditional croissant dough, and easy enough to make just about any time you want it. More

Culinary Ambassadors: Breakfast in France

Traditional French breakfast fare includes a tartine — half a split, buttered baguette with your choice of conserves (jams) to dip in your very own bowl of café au lait or chocolat chaude (hot chocolate). Croissants are not an everyday item, but for those not counting calories, you'll see them at the table as well. Dipping is not only reserved for kids. Fully grown adults do it, too (it's not uncommon to see men in business suits dip the corner of a croissant into their coffee). Let's not forget the obligatory glass of juice (orange or multi-fruits seem to be preferred by most) and a quick expresso (espresso) to prepare an eater for the day. More

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