'colombia' on Serious Eats

Latin American Cuisine: Roasted Ripe Plantains with Cream and Sugar

Four ingredients—a ripe plantain, heavy cream, sugar, and cinnamon—get roasted together until the sugar is lightly caramelized and the cream has soaked into the plantain, turning its texture rich and custard-like, almost like a plantain pudding. It takes all of three minutes to throw together (five if you're really terrible at peeling plantains), plus a short stay in the oven, and you've got a crave-worthy dessert hot and ready to go. More

Colombian-style Barbecued Beef Ribs

The best part of the steak is always the fatty, crispy bits near the bones. Here's a secret: You don't have to eat the steak first. This recipe for Colombian-style beef rib barbecue delivers the goods. Fat will render. Connective tissue will soften. Bark will be formed. Dinner will be had. More

Latin Cuisine: Five Ingredient, One Pot, 30-Minute Colombian Chicken Stew

This is the first—and probably tastiest—dish that my wife ever taught me how to cook from her home in Bogotá, high in the mountains of Colombia. The Capital city of 10 million people sits in a valley at over 8,000 feet above sea level, which means that the pressure cooker is a staple in pretty much every kitchen. This extraordinarily simple chicken and potato stew uses just five ingredients (ok, seven if you count salt and pepper), but the flavor that comes out after a brief cook under pressure is complex, rich, and filling. More

Latin American Cuisine: How To Make Colombian Style Shrimp Ceviche Cocktail

It's totally understandable that my future wife thought that I might judge her (not to mention her culture and her cuisine) for serving me cooked shrimp dressed with a mixture of bottled mayonnaise and ketchup, served on top of Saltine crackers, no less. And really, that's all that Colombian-style shrimp cocktail is. And yet, it's much, much more. Fragrant with onions and lime juice with a hint of heat and a bright acidity, the best shrimp cocktail should have tiny shrimp that are totally packed with flavor while maintaining a tender, nearly crisp bite to them. More

Latin American Cuisine: Colombian Arepas

The most basic arepas in the Bogotá region are made with starchy white corn flour pressed into cakes about 1/4-inch thick then griddled. But that's just the tip of the iceberg. You'll find arepas stuffed with cheese and baked on hot stones in coal-fired ovens. Arepas with sour milk cheese worked right into the dough. Arepas made like a pancake with sweet corn on a hot griddle. Golden yellow deep-fried puffy arepas split open and stuffed with an egg. Tiny arepitas eaten as a snack. Move out of Colombia into Venezuela, and you'll find thicker arepas split open and stuffed with fillings ranging from cheese and beans to pork or shrimp. More

Deal of the Day: Cafecito Bogota

This Saturday, Cafecito Bogota is giving away 50 free fruit cholados—a Colombian treat somewhere between a fruit salad and smoothie—starting at 1 p.m. 1015 Manhattan Avenue, Greenpoint Brooklyn (at Green Street; map); 718-569-0077... More

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