'colas' on Serious Eats

Pepsi Throwback Coming Back December 28

Due to popular demand, Pepsi Throwback is making a comeback. As you may recall, Throwback is Pepsi made with cane sugar rather than HFCS. Throwback will reappear December 28 for an eight-week run. If Pepsi Co. were a little smarter, it would extend the period through April 6, to cover Passover. See also: A Beginner's Guide to Passover Coke. See also: Rob Walker's piece on Mexican Coke. [via Kottke]... More

Snapshots from the UK: Pepsi Raw

"It tastes like you'd imagine Victorian drug store cola to taste." My idea of a natural soda usually involves an experiment in mixing seltzer water and fresh juice. You get to watch the mixture fizz and spit and change color, just like with an amateur chemistry set. So when I saw the "Natural Born Cola" Pepsi Raw (marketed in the U.S. as Pepsi Natural) in the cold drinks section at my local pharmacy here in England, I was intrigued by the slim-as-a-Red-Bull, dark-as-a-brown-M&M can. The ingredients listed are "sparkling water, cane sugar, apple extract, colourings: plain caramel, natural plant extracts including natural caffeine and kola nut extract, citric tartaric and lactic acids, (stabilizer) gum arabic, (thickener) xanthan gum."... More

The Joys of Unnaturally Flavored Sodas

Fess up, serious eaters, do you have a favorite? I think it was a few weeks ago, when I ran into Tom Colicchio, that I found myself confessing my love for Fresca. I had seen an interview Colicchio had done in the New York Times Magazine in which he declared his love of Fresca: "Always in fridge: Fresca. It is just a great drink. No calories; tastes like citrus." During our discussion we both acknowledged that what we loved about Fresca was its taste, even though neither of us could identify its ingredients. Hey, Colicchio is, after all, Mr. Ingredients, Mr. Craft, so it says quite a bit about Fresca if he can't tell us what's in it. So now... More

'Coca-Cola Classic' Changing Name Back to 'Coca-Cola'

Coca-Cola has announced that it's dropping the "Classic" label from its name in the U.S. The extra bit was added to the original formula's packaging in 1985, when the company introduced the poorly received "New Coke" line. Says Ad Age: But the word has gradually outlived its usefulness as the company has sought an increasingly global approach. The popular "Coke side of life" and new "Open happiness" campaigns have not used the word. "Classic" would have been used only in advertising specific to North America, said Scott Williamson, a Coca-Cola spokesman. Of course, we wouldn't mind if they went really old school and brought back the formula that uses cane sugar instead of HFCS as a sweetener. Related In Videos:... More

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