'cognac' on Serious Eats

Edible Pantries

This cocktail from Mark Brinker and Jessica Tessendorf of Chicago's Barrelhouse Flat is a tasty fall drink with a cognac base. Fernet Branca, maple syrup, and apple cider vinegar all contribute to the subtle complexity of the flavor, while cinnamon adds an autumnal aroma. More

The Serious Eats Guide to Cognac

Cognac. To many, it's the ultimate in brandy. Now, you may ask why? Does it taste better? is it the expense? The time to make it? The grapes? The history? I'd say it's all of those things, and more. But what is cognac? How's it made, and what makes it special? More

The Serious Eats Guide to Brandy

When I mention brandy, you probably have an image already in your head. An older gentleman, sitting quietly in a leather armchair, perhaps smoking a pipe while listening to Brahms, swirling a snifter of brandy around in his hand. We think of brandy as an Old World after-dinner drink. And I have to say, it serves that purpose beautifully. But if you limit it to that, you're missing out on a lot. More

Midnight Cowboy's Fish House Punch

The Fish House Punch was first concocted at a gentlemen's fishing club in Philadelphia. The original recipe called for peach brandy. In this modern version, Brian Dressel of Midnight Cowboy in Austin, Texas replaces peach brandy with a mix of peach liqueur and cognac, and tames the rum-forward punch with green tea, maraschino liqueur, and citrus. More

Cocktail Overhaul: Mudslide

The original Mudslide was allegedly invented during the 1950s at the Wreck Bar in the Cayman Islands. In its heyday the frozen drink was often made with a mix that came in a plastic bottle. Classy, right? It's time to elevate the Mudslide to the level of respectability and craftsmanship that it deserves. More

Stay Up Late

This variation on the Tom Collins is super-simple to make. It appeared in the 1946 Stork Club Bar Book by Lucius Beebe—we got this version of the recipe from Theo Lieberman of Lantern's Keep in NYC. More

Japanese Cocktail

The Japanese Cocktail, curiously made with mostly French ingredients, is like an Old Fashioned with a rich and nutty twist. This classic cocktail included in Jerry Thomas' Bar-Tender's Guide in 1862. More

More Posts