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Chinese Aromatics 101: Stir-Fried Tripe With Pickled Mustard Greens

Shao Z. 5 comments

This dish, from the Hakka Chinese community, is an offal lover's dream: snappy omasum (bible) tripe stir-fried with tart mustard greens, fermented black beans, and red chilies. More

Stir-Fried Tripe With Pickled Mustard Greens and Fermented Black Beans

Serious Eats Shao Z. Post a comment

This dish, from the Hakka Chinese community, is an offal lover's dream: snappy omasum (bible) tripe stir-fried with tart mustard greens, fermented black beans, and red chilies. More

Chinese Aromatics 101: Stir-Fried Shrimp With Eggs and Chinese Chives

Shao Z. 9 comments

This quick-to-cook stir-fry of eggs with shrimp, Chinese chives, garlic, and ginger is popular among Cantonese home cooks for both its ease and wonderful flavor. It's a good example of the mild aromatic flavor base common to Cantonese cooking, here with Chinese chives in place of the more common scallions. More

Stir-Fried Shrimp With Eggs and Chinese Chives

Serious Eats Shao Z. Post a comment

This quick-to-cook stir-fry of eggs with shrimp, Chinese chives, garlic, and ginger is popular among Cantonese home cooks for both its ease and wonderful flavor. It can be made with or without the shrimp, or with sliced roast pork in place of the shrimp. More

Chinese Aromatics 101: The Mild and Aromatic Ginger, Scallion, and Garlic Flavor Base

Shao Z. Post a comment

Does China have an aromatic-vegetable equivalent to French mirepoix? Not exactly, but there are some general categories that are helpful in understanding how Chinese flavor bases work. In the second part of this series, we take a closer look at one of them: The more mild ginger, garlic, and scallion flavor base of Guangdong province's famed Cantonese cooking. More

Chinese Aromatics 101: The Spicy Garlic-and-Chili Flavor Base

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Does China have an aromatic-vegetable equivalent to French mirepoix? Not exactly, but there are some general categories that are helpful in understanding how Chinese flavor bases work. Here, we take a closer look at one of them: Spicy aromatics with garlic and chilies that are famous in Hunan and Sichuan cooking. More

Chinese Aromatics 101: Kung Pao Fish With Dried Chilies and Sichuan Peppercorns

Shao Z. 8 comments

In this series on the most common aromatic flavor bases of Chinese cooking, we're looking first at those regions famous for their spicy garlic-and-chili flavors. Today, Kung Pao made with fish instead of chicken serves as an example of Sichuan's mouth-numbing, hot mala style, characterized by dried chilies, Sichuan peppercorns, and garlic. More

Chinese Aromatics 101: Spicy and Sour Stir-Fried Cabbage With Bacon

Shao Z. 3 comments

In this first installment of our series on the most common aromatic flavor bases of Chinese cooking, we look at the famously fiery heat of Hunanese food through the lens of this classic and simple dish of hand-torn cabbage stir-fried with garlic, scallions, and fresh red chilies. More

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