'chinese american' on Serious Eats

How to Make Takeout-Style Kung Pao Chicken

As much as I now love real-deal Sichuan kung-pao chicken, my absolute favorite Chinese dish as a kid was this mildly spiced Americanized version—and to be honest, I still love it today. Just because it's a Chinese-American standard, complete with slightly-gloppy-sauce and mild heat doesn't make diced chicken with peppers and peanuts any less delicious. Here's how to make it at home. More

The Food Lab: Bringing Home General Tso's Chicken

If the British can proudly call Chicken Tikka Masala their national dish, then surely it's time that General Tso got his chicken in our national spotlight. Everybody knows the candy-sweet take-out joint version, but I firmly believe that it has the potential to be so much more than that. How great would a homemade version of General Tso's be, with a flavor that shows some real complexity and a texture that takes that crisp-crust-juicy-center balance to the extreme? More

The Best General Tso's Chicken

If the British can proudly call Chicken Tikka Masala their national dish, then surely it's time that General Tso got his chicken in our national spotlight. Everybody knows the candy-sweet take-out joint version, but I firmly believe that it has the potential to be so much more than that. How great would a homemade version of General Tso's be, with a flavor that shows some real complexity and a texture that takes that crisp-crust-juicy-center balance to the extreme? Our version does just that. More

The Food Lab: Stir-Fried Beef With Broccoli in Oyster Sauce

The beef and broccoli of my youth, I must say, was pretty special. I grew up in New York and Boston, both of which have seriously good Chinatowns and many restaurants specializing in the Chinese-American, Cantonese-derived dishes popular in food courts across the country. Beef and broccoli is one of the most popular, and with good reason. Who could say no to tender strips of marinated beef seared to a smoky crispness in a hot wok, tossed with charred florets of crisp, bright green broccoli, all tossed in a savory-sweet, garlic and ginger-scented oyster sauce? I sure as heck loved me the hell out of some beef and broccoli as a kid. More

The Food Lab: For the Best Stir-Fry, Fire Up the Grill

Take a look in a Chinese restaurant kitchen and you'll see the wok chef tossing the contents of his wok with one hand while scooping up bits of sauce and seasonings with the wide flat ladle held in his other, all the while adjusting two valves set by below the surface with a flick of his knees. An no, we're not going to building a Chinese restaurant kitchen at home today. What we are going to do is work our way through a few different common home methods of stir-frying to see if we can come up with the ideal way to approximate restaurant-quality dishes. More

Lunch Today: Good Vegan Cuisine at Wild Ginger

I've made my stance on faux meat pretty clear in the past (hint: I don't like it) and I've never been to a Pan Asian restaurant I've liked. This made my choice of Wild Ginger, a vegan, pro-faux restaurant serving such enticing-sounding dishes as General Tsao's Soy Protein and Tofu Teriyaki Sizzling Platter a little suspect. What was I thinking? Luckily, turns out that amidst all that nonsense, there are some actually tasty lunch options. More

Date Night: King Yum

When King Yum opened almost 60 years ago, Americans were in the midst of an affair with all things Polynesian. King Yum was deeply of the moment, a casually elegant destination restaurant, like a Queens version of Mad Men (Mad Mensch?). The menu has evolved some since then, and adults no longer dress for dinner in quite the same way, but the vibe feels essentially unchanged. In here, dinner is an event, white tablecloths are a matter of course, and too much familiarity with actual Chinese cooking would seem vaguely suspicious. Purists may sneer at the pu pu platter and General Tao's chicken, but dinner at King Yum is an authentically American experience. More

RedFarm: Chinese-American Done Justice in the West Village

High-end dim sum is what Ed Schoenfeld and Joe Ng do best. The former is the man behind Chinatown Brasserie, Shun Lee, and Shun Lee Palace; the latter, a dim sum chef Schoenfeld met in Sunset Park and brought on board at Chinatown Brasserie. Almost a year ago, the chef-restauteur pair launched the RedFarm stall in the upscale food court FoodParc, where we loved the dumplings and pastrami egg rolls and quite a bit else. And finally, after a number of delays and what seemed like weeks of preview dinners, they've opened their newest restaurant, also called RedFarm, in a townhouse in the West Village. More

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