'charcuterie' on Serious Eats

Cured Meats Rule at Cask and Larder in Winter Park, Florida

The DIY charcuterie movement has finally reached country-wide levels of pervasiveness, which is a good and a bad thing. In the wrong hands, house-made charcuterie is a step down from store-bought options (the number of times I've had improperly emulsified sausages or poorly cured hams far exceeds the number of excellent ones I've had), and potential dangerous. In the right hands, the interplay of meat, salt, and time can be a truly revelatory eating experience. Chef de Cuisine Dennis Bernard of Cask and Larder in Winter Park, Florida, has the right hands, along with the brains and humility to know when to use them. More

The Food Lab: How To Make a Foie Gras Torchon (Secret Technique Inside!)

A perfect foie torchon melts on the tongue like the creamiest butter, but with a distinct cured sweetness that forms the perfect balance for a perfumed wine. It's simple to serve—just slice it, put it on a piece of toast, add a bit of dried fruit or preserves, and go—and let's face it, it'll impress your guests. It's the ultimate in hors d'oeuvres, using not just one of the finest ingredients money can buy, but also showcasing your kitchen skills. More

First Look: Salty Sow in Austin, Texas

The meat-centric restaurant Salty Sow recently opened up on Austin's east side. This latest nose-to-tail venture is powered by the owners of Eddie V's and Hopdoddy (the steakhouse and mini burger chain, respectively). It's no surprise that this menu is dominated by animal-driven dishes. Check out the charcuterie plate, bone marrow, and more. More

Pork and Liver Pâté

Making this pâté at home, it was a struggle to wait until it had cooled with all those heady, meaty aromas and the lovely layer of bacon on top. Slicing into it, the texture was rustically grainy with an over-the-top porky flavor. It's fatty enough to easily spread on toast. Juniper and brandy come through in a big herbal way. Sliced thin and served alongside crusty bread with a bit of mustard and cornichons (and of course, a glass of wine) this pâté is probably the most authentically French dish to come out of my kitchen. More

Apps Only: Tree

Editor's note: In "Apps Only," Ben Fishner will be eating his way through New York's appetizer, bar, and lounge menus as your guide to fine dining on a budget. He blogs at Ben Cooks Everything. Tree's charcuterie plate. [Photos:... More

A Look at Olympic Provisions, Oregon's First USDA-Approved Salumeria

The door separating the Olympic Provisions restaurant-deli from the chamber in the back says it all: MEAT DEPT. (In all caps, if you didn't catch that.) The meat-curing facility is Oregon's first USDA-approved salumeria, which means salumist Elias Cairo makes charcuterie with a USDA inspector watching him for a whole 40 hours a week—sticking flashlights into the grinders and swab-testing the walls, spices, and floors, to ensure a health code-happy process. More

Cook the Book: Pork Shoulder Rillettes

The chapter devoted to all things porcine in My New Orleans by John Besh is called Boucherie, and has several delicious-sounding pork-based charcuterie projects including these Pork Shoulder Rillettes. This version slow cooks pork butt with chicken stock, lard, wine, and a few other aromatics until it's tender enough to shred into a million tasty little pieces. More

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