'cachaca' on Serious Eats

DIY vs. Buy: How to Make Swedish Punsch

Prohibition did more than inspire an HBO gangster drama about how Steve Buscemi is rich and sleeps with showgirls while people get shot. Making booze illegal changed the way America drank, banishing a lot of popular ingredients to obscurity. One of the cocktail casualties was Swedish Punsch, a liqueur made with citrus, spices, rum, and a southeastern Asian liquor made with sugar cane and red rice called Batavia Arrack. More

DIY Swedish Punsch

The traditional way to serve Swedish Punsch is to warm it and pair it with a bowl of pea soup. Though that didn't exactly catch on in the States, Swedish Punsch is a key ingredient in many pre-Prohibition cocktails because of its funky, spiced flavor. More

Drinking the Bottom Shelf: Cachaca da Roca

Bottom Shelf research director Emily and I recently decided to re-sign our apartment lease, with mixed emotions. Our building is OK but we could do better for the money; there are all sorts of fancy amenities that don't interest us, such as underground parking and unintimidating neighbors. I'd rather trade in the meek empty-nesters—who, to their credit, never make noise and rarely steal my FedEx packages—for an extra bedroom or better dive bar proximity. More

Brunch Drinks: Mojo Rising

Mojitos are such a refreshing way to chase the sticky morning heat; but if you're like me, the last thing you want is a big mouthful of yard clippings every time you take a sip. And lot of mojitos are so cloying that they leave me even thirstier, rather than slaking a sticky throat the way a proper cocktail should. Clearly this wheel, while not needing reinvention, needed a little tuning. More

Mojo Rising

Mojitos are such a refreshing way to chase the sticky morning heat; but if you're like me, the last thing you want is a big mouthful of yard clippings every time you take a sip. And lot of mojitos are so cloying that they leave me even thirstier, rather than slaking a sticky throat the way a proper cocktail should. Clearly this wheel, while not needing reinvention, needed a little tuning. More

How to Make Pitcher Drinks Tastier, Less Diluted

Pitcher drinks have a lot of appeal during the warmer months, but many recipes suffer from an excess of ingredients, or grow watery and insipid quickly. In today's Washington Post, Jason Wilson touches on a couple of points that can ensure pitcher-drink success. For example, the smaller the ice pieces, the more rapidly they'll dilute the drink generally speaking. Some dilution is desired, of course, but it's a fine line between "just right" and "too much." More

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