'braising' on Serious Eats

The Food Lab: Crispy Braised Chicken With White Beans and Chile Verde

We're taking the intensely rich, smoky, and hot chile sauce from a Southwestern chile verde, the comforting bean stew of white chicken chili, and adding to it my own personal touch: a perfectly braised piece of chicken; deep flavors, crisp skin, and all. If you're into heat, beans, and chicken, this is about as comforting a dish as you can hope for when the hot summer days start to slowly transition into cool fall evenings. More

Sichuan Braised Pork Cheeks

I can never get enough of a Sichuan-style red-braise with chili bean paste (made from fava beans and chili oil), fermented black beans, soy sauce, wine, and sugar. Plenty of sichuan peppercorns go into the braise and are sprinkled on top, if desired. The spicy rich sauce can be spooned over rice or noodles and served with vegetables, roasted or braised. Daikon is the classic Sichuan pairing for red-braised meat, but root vegetables of any kind would be good, as would cauliflower or long-cooked greens. More

Eat for Eight Bucks: Easy Slow-Cooker Pork Tacos with Red Cabbage Crunch and Avocado

I love soft tacos, at home and at restaurants. Since a taco's filling is infinitely variable, the choice lies in your hands to make them cheap or expensive. You could buy fresh fish, for example, but that would up the price a bit. You could also consider a wide range of potential garnishes, everything from salsa to shredded cheese to cilantro to black beans. On the other hand, if you're looking to save money, the trick is to minimize. Use a filling that's hearty but cheap, and practice rigid discipline with respect to your garnishes. More

Dinner Tonight: Braised Chicken with Leeks and Cream

Chicken can braise in under an hour, and the thighs and legs are a perfect candidate for the job: They don't dry out like the breast, and they absorb tons of flavor from the cooking liquid. To keep things light, I used leeks and white wine as the base of the sauce, finishing with just a bit of cream. The key is a very good sear at the beginning to build flavor. More

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