'bitters' on Serious Eats

3 Great New(ish) Cocktail Bitters

Back in my day, when you wanted to make a cocktail, and you needed some cocktail bitters, you went to the soda-pop aisle of your grocery and found the shelves dedicated to mixers for adult beverages, and if you were lucky, you'd see a bottle of Angostura right there sitting next to the lime cordial and the sour mix and the tonic water. These days, you kids are spoiled for choice. More

A Guide to Defunct Cocktail Ingredients

When you start looking through vintage cocktail books, one thing you'll quickly notice are the names of obscure ingredients. Now, some of these ingredients are still in production—you might have to hunt a while; you might even need to have a friend bring a bottle home from overseas. But others are truly defunct, no longer made. What did they taste like? How were they made? Here's our guide to a few bitters, liqueurs, and cordials that truly have disappeared...and a few that are being revived by upstart brands. More

Add Bitters To Your Soda! 12 Combos We Love

One of our favorite beverages around the Serious Eats office is bitters and soda. We've got a good dozen types of bitters in the Serious Eats liquor shelves—cranberry! Peychaud's! black walnut!—and just a few dashes can turn plain ol' soda water into something much more exciting. But what about bitters and soda? Like soda-soda, pop-soda, not soda water. Why have diet Coke when I could have diet rhubarb coke? Why cream soda when it's so easy to make creamsicle-soda? More

DIY vs. Buy: How to Make Cherry Bitters

Asking me to pick my favorite cocktail is sort of like asking parents which of their kids is the best. It's a hard question to answer, but deep in my heart, I know. Sorry, Sazerac and Martini, even though I love you so, the Manhattan is easily my favorite drink. So I was surprised that a simple change to this classic drink made me love it even more. More

DIY Cherry Bitters

Swapping in cherry bitters for Angostura bitters can give your cocktails a subtle yet delightful boost, adding a hint of fruit while still delivering the bitterness your drink needs. The best part about making your own is you can customize your bitters to your cocktailing needs. More

DIY vs. Buy: How to Make Amaro

Amaro is yet another item from behind the bar that started out as a way to cure what ailed us—it was once a treatment for everything from an upset stomach or colicky baby to cholera. Really, "amaro" (or amari, in the plural) is just a general name for a bitter, herbal liqueur. More

DIY vs. Buy: How to Make Rhubarb Bitters

Rhubarb is one of my favorite cocktail ingredients. When rhubarb season arrived, I ran to buy as much as I could from the market that's usually first to get all the seasonal produce. When I couldn't find it, I went to the manager in a panic. "We used to stock that," he said. "But nobody likes it, so we stopped." I then dramatically flung myself onto the nearest support beam and screamed, "Noooooo!" as if I just found out Darth Vader was my father. (He is not.) Luckily, the next store had a whole display of rhubarb and promised me that they would keep stocking it throughout the season. More

Cocktail Trend: More Than A Dash of Bitters

Bitters are often thought of as the salt and pepper of the cocktail world, adding just a touch of spice to focus and deepen the flavors of a drink. It makes sense to use them sparingly—a 4-ounce bottle of Angostura can sell for $9 or more, and it's potent stuff, so a drop or two goes a long way. "But we're living in an age of extreme ingredients," says Theo Lieberman of Lantern's Keep and Milk & Honey in NYC, "everywhere you look, there's pork belly." So perhaps the time for the extreme use of bitters has come. More

The Dutchess

This cocktail from Theo Lieberman of Lantern's Keep and Milk & Honey in NYC has a heavy pour of Angostura bitters in it, but that doesn't make it bitter. The spice is balanced with bright fruit and rich almond from housemade orgeat. More

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