'belgian beer' on Serious Eats

Highlights from Portland, Oregon's 2012 Cheers to Belgian Beers

Portland's Cheers to Belgian Beers is both a competition and a beer showcase. Each year, the previous year's winner selects a yeast strain, and in the winter prior to the fest, brewers throw darts to determine which style of beer they will make using that yeast. This gives them just a few months to craft their beers for competition. A combination of adventurous creativity, resourcefulness, and traditional Belgophilic inspiration seemed to be the keys behind the festival's most successful beers. More

12 Days of Christmas Beer: Kerstmutske Christmas Nightcap

This Christmas beer from Brouwerij Slaapmutske tells you pretty much all you need to know in the scent: toffee pudding, sticky prunes and dates, hints of mulling spice and orange zest. Let it warm up a bit—it is a nightcap, after all—and you'll be wrapped in rich molasses and toffee flavors and hints of brown bread with raisins. This beer is brewed without spices; it doesn't need them, since there's plenty of fruity yeast esters and deep tones from the malt. More

Belgian Tripel (For Beginning Homebrewers)

This pale, strong beer of is recognized by its fruit and spice aromas and sweet malt flavor that seems to quickly dissipate from the tongue. The simplicity of the base recipe makes this an excellent style for the beginning homebrewer, but it will also push the limits for the advanced homebrewer trying to capture that perfect Belgian yeast character. More

Serious Beer: Tasting Belgian Fruit Lambic

If you haven't tasted a traditional Kriek or Framboise before, you're in for a surprise. They're funky and acidic, with hints of shoe leather and wet dog. These days, you'll frequently see fruit beers with added sweeteners and fruit juices—lots of folks love them, but we encourage you to try the real thing sometime. Traditionally sour fruit lambics may not be beers for beginners, but they're a palate-expanding experience we highly recommend. More

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