'asian' on Serious Eats

How to Make Chinese Lotus Seed Buns to Rival Any Bakery's

Fluffy and sweet, lotus seed buns are a popular treat at Chinese bakeries. As the name implies, they're flavored with a paste made from lotus flower seeds, which have a light, chestnut-like flavor. This recipe for homemade buns has been perfected to work with either low-gluten flour, or all-purpose. Hot from the steamer, they're a confection not to be missed. The only thing that could make them either better is a cup of bubble tea. More

Light and Tender Chinese Lotus Seed Buns

Fluffy and sweet, lotus seed buns are a popular treat at Chinese bakeries. As the name implies, they're flavored with a paste made from lotus flower seeds, which have a light, chestnut-like flavor. This recipe for homemade buns has been perfected to work with either low-gluten flour, or all-purpose. Hot from the steamer, they're a confection not to be missed. The only thing that could make them either better is a cup of bubble tea. More

The Food Lab Turbo: Make This Smoky Eggplant Topping to Upgrade Your Ramen

I spend an awful lot of time experimenting with ramen toppings. And of all the toppings I've created, this smoky eggplant is the one. Whether you're making ramen from scratch, or just want to improve a store-bought kit, look no further than this chunky puree of eggplant meat infused with the Japanese flavors of bonito flakes, mirin, and soy sauce. More

Thai-Style Grilled Chicken (Gai Yang)

Thai-style grilled chicken coated in a marinade flavored with cilantro, white pepper, and fish sauce is one of the tastiest things you'll ever pull off of your grill. There's a reason you can't walk more than a few blocks in Bangkok without catching a whiff of its intense aroma. Here's how to make it in your own backyard. More

Chinese Velveting 101: An Introduction to Water-Velveting

Velveting meat is a common practice in Chinese stir-fries: By marinating strips of meat with egg white and cornstarch, then dipping then in a hot oil bath before finally stir-frying them, the meat develops a texture that is tender, silky, and smooth. But the hot oil bath is cumbersome for home cooks. Here's how to do it with water instead at home, with just-as-good results. More

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