'artichokes' on Serious Eats

In a Pickle: Marinated Artichoke Hearts

I like using frozen artichoke hearts in pasta and will frequently buy them from the grocery store, marinated in flavorful oil. When presented with artichoke dip, I will not say no. And in the springtime, I do love ordering them lightly fried and dressed with lemon juice from an Italian spot in my neighborhood. But despite this lifelong appreciation for the artichoke, it wasn't until recently that I tried to trim a batch and marinate them myself. And like so many things, doing it myself increased my enjoyment many times over. More

Cook the Book: Braised Goat Meatballs with Artichokes and Fennel

Meatballs generally fall under the category of cold-weather eating but these Braised Goat Meatballs with Artichokes and Fennel from Bruce Weinstein and Mark Scarbrough's Goat: Meat, Milk, Cheese couldn't be springier. Spiced with a wonderfully Greek combination of oregano and dill, these meatballs are simmered in a light tomato broth scented with cinnamon and lemon. More

Edible DIY: Marinated Artichoke Hearts

The bay leaves give these artichokes a subtle woodsy, almost piney flavor, and you can really taste the citrus and spice. They would be perfect in salads (naturally), as a pizza topping, or as part of an antipasti platter. The best part is you use frozen artichoke hearts—so easy! No stemming, blanching, or trimming of outer leaves required. More

Marinated Artichoke Hearts

The bay leaves give these artichokes a subtle woodsy, almost piney flavor, and you can really taste the citrus and spice. They would be perfect in salads, as a pizza topping, or as part of an antipasti platter. This recipe... More

In Season: Artichokes

While much of the country won't see artichokes at farmers' markets for awhile, California residents are lucky to have the pine-cone shaped perennials in season now. Artichokes are available all year on the West Coast, but they peak from March to May and again in October. Originating in the Mediterranean, an overwhelming majority of artichokes grown in the United States are from California. The plants are actually the buds of thistles, which are in the sunflower family. More

How America Ate: Leone's Italian Cookbook

Italian cooking in America in the mid-twentieth century was an arid desert of dried basil flakes, enlivened by the occasional tumbleweed of meatball and oasis of canned red sauce. Americans were eating bastardized versions of Italian classics devoid of all flavor and passion years before The Olive Garden brought them to a mall near you. Except those who were lucky enough to be working with Leone's Italian Cookbook, however. Those folks were years ahead of their time. More

Easy Artichoke Dip

Although in theory this dip should serve six, I find that people get a little strange around artichoke dip. They elbow each other out of the way and scoop a little too much onto their bread. Be ye warned, you... More

In Season: Artichokes

Depending on where you live, it may already be artichoke season. While artichokes grow wild in parts of Mediterranean Europe, they're cultivated in many parts of the States; an enormous percentage of the country's supply comes from California. Part of the thistle family, the plants have huge, edible buds that constitute the artichokes we see at the store and in markets. More

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