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The Nasty Bits: Liver Stuffing

The Nasty Bits Chichi Wang 8 comments

Take my word for it: if you love stuffing, and you happen to love or even like liver, then your Thanksgiving stuffing will be indeed be made ten times better with the addition of liver. More

The Nasty Bits: Spicy and Tingly Lamb's Face Salad from Xian Famous Foods

The Nasty Bits Chichi Wang 17 comments

<Xian Famous Foods in New York City specializes in, as its name might suggest, the famous foods of Xian in Northern China. The restaurant is known for its great noodles, buns, and meat. Most of all, its sauce —the spicy, oily, tongue-numbing, chock-full-of-cumin sauce which coats this lamb's face salad. More

Lamb's Face Salad

Serious Eats Chichi Wang 1 comment

Tender braised lamb's face meat in a crunchy salad with spiced salty-sweet-hot dressing. More

Tongue Sandwich with Tarragon or Parsley Sauce

Serious Eats Chichi Wang Post a comment

A crispy veal tongue sandwich with horseradish, bitter greens, and a creamy, tangy tarragon sauce. More

The Nasty Bits: Tongue Cemita Sandwich

The Nasty Bits Chichi Wang 3 comments

I used to think that the best usage for beef tongue in Mexican cuisine was tacos de lengua, but that just goes to show you how little I know about tongues. Turns out I like tongue cemitas just as much as tongue tacos, if not more. A cemita is a class of Mexican sandwich with meat, avocado, white cheese, onions and some sort of red sauce, usually on a sesame seed roll. Regional variations abound. More

Cemitas de Lengua (Mexican Tongue Sandwiches)

Serious Eats Chichi Wang 2 comments

A Mexican beef tongue sandwich with black beans, avocado, and crema. More

The Nasty Bits: Oxtail Marmalade

The Nasty Bits Chichi Wang 2 comments

I bet you never thought you'd utter oxtail and marmalade in the same breath. It is a sweet dish, sweetened with brown sugar and rich with red wine and red wine vinegar. There is something distinctly jam-like, I'll admit, about spreading the oxtail on toast. More

The Nasty Bits: How to Eat Bone Marrow

The Nasty Bits Chichi Wang 22 comments

Bone marrow is such a stand-out ingredient. You can't just throw it on a plate, and pretend like it's any old cut. Either contrast it with acidic and refreshing flavors or accent its fattiness with something even richer. Here are six ways you can eat it. More

Roasted Bone Marrow with Shallot and Currant Confit

Serious Eats Chichi Wang 2 comments

The sweet richness of shallots and onions makes a great foil for roasted marrow. More

The Nasty Bits: Quail

The Nasty Bits Chichi Wang 10 comments

I bought six little quails all for myself. They taste sort of like tiny ducks since their breast meat is dark rather than white. I cooked the six quails in different ways, on different days, and dined alone. My favorite way was the simmered quail with mustard and capers. More

The Nasty Bits: Shrimp Heads

The Nasty Bits Chichi Wang 12 comments

I don't make this fried shrimp recipe just so I can eat the shrimp heads. That would be like making chocolate chip cookies just for the chocolate. You need both: the interplay between the richness and the supporting structure. But certainly the shrimp heads are the lure, the main attraction. More

The Nasty Bits: Bacon-Wrapped Liver

The Nasty Bits Chichi Wang 8 comments

If you're thinking, well, isn't bacon-wrapped-anything just an excuse to eat bacon, and I say to that, your point being? Actually the two go together quite well - the bacon keeps the liver from overcooking or breaking off into chunks on the grill. More

The Nasty Bits: Stir-Fried Tripe with Chili Bean Paste

The Nasty Bits Chichi Wang 3 comments

Beef tripe, stir-fried with chili bean paste and a touch of soy sauce. Add ginger, scallions, garlic. The slices will soak up the flavors and seasonings, all the while retaining their crispy edges. Serve with rice. Eat as much of this (stomach) as you can stomach. More

The Nasty Bits: Tripe Salad

The Nasty Bits Chichi Wang Post a comment

Tripe salad (emphasis on salad) features cooked honeycomb tripe dressed in olive oil, lemon, and vinegar with red chili pepper flakes and parsley. The lemon and vinegar cuts through the richness of the tripe. More

Marinated Tripe Salad

Serious Eats Chichi Wang Post a comment

Tripe salad (emphasis on salad) features cooked honeycomb tripe dressed in olive oil, lemon, and vinegar with red chili pepper flakes and parsley. The lemon and vinegar cuts through the richness of the tripe. More

Nasty Bits: Goat Ribs, Part Two

The Nasty Bits Chichi Wang Post a comment

The concentration of cumin seeds on just one rack of lamb is startling. Then you bite into a rib, stewed until it is fork-tender, and the cumin seeds crunch and crackle in your mouth. One of the best bites in recent memory. More

The Nasty Bits: Goat Meat, Part One

The Nasty Bits Chichi Wang 12 comments

The one thing I always like to say to disarm people who fear goat, is "Betcha didn't know that cashmere comes from goat." Once I say that, it's like the goat floodgates open, and people figure that if it's good enough to wear then it's good enough to eat. Goat is closer in flavor to lamb than mutton, which is to say, the flesh is not as gamey as you might think. More

The Nasty Bits: On Not Overcooking Liver

The Nasty Bits Chichi Wang 6 comments

There is nothing (nothing!) that makes me grumpier and more prone to tears in the kitchen than overcooking liver. Liver, when cooked rare to medium rare, is so sweet and creamy, you could eat the leftovers cold, like pâté. More

The Nasty Bits Retrospective: 12 Ways to Eat Offal

The Nasty Bits Chichi Wang 5 comments

Wow, I've been writing about animal parts here for a while now. It was tough picking just a dozen posts to highlight in this retrospective, but here they are—some oldies (like pig's ear salad) as well as newer hits that have been especially delicious (stir-fried tongue). More

Crispy Grilled Beef Tongue

Serious Eats Chichi Wang 3 comments

Tongue is a stress-free option for the grill. You simmer the tongue in water or stock, adding aromatics and spices. If I'm really pressed for time and mental reserves, I may do nothing more than plop a tongue into a pot with water and keep the heat on low. A few hours of simmering does the bulk of the work. Once simmered, you peel the tongue and cut it into thickish slabs, perfect for tossing on the grill. Because tongue is so fatty, you don't have to worry about it getting tough or dry. More

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