'bedford stuyvesant' on Serious Eats

Eat SCRATCHbread's Peasant Sourdough and Outlast the Cold

The Peasant Sourdough comes out the oven looking like some crusty rye loaf, but it's actually on the soft and thin-crusted side. As in many SCRATCH products, the bakers build the ingredients for this bread out of a small group of building blocks that are also used for other loaves. First comes the sourdough starter, made from oat mash, rice, and wheatberries. To this they add cane sugar, a bran mix of wheat bran, flax seed, and oats, and then a mixture of dark rye, whole wheat, regular wheat, and spelt flours. More

College Tours: Where to Eat Near Pratt Institute

When I moved to into a Mattress Factory loft in Bedford Stuyvesant, the food options looked bleak. But it was close to campus and the view was phenomenal. It didn't take long to discover I was on the edge of the blooming culinary scene surrounding Pratt. Pratt students are surrounded by affordable, delicious food options, with many more just a G Train ride away. More

The Brunch Dish: Brunch in a Cup at SCRATCHbread in Bed-Stuy

When I first heard about SCRATCHbread's "brunch in a cup," I have to admit that my brain did a few rather skeptical somersaults. But then again, it didn't hurt that the weather has been particularly fine, or that founder Matthew Tilden named this novel concept STOOPbrunch, implying that his creations are meant to be consumed while sitting outside, basking in the sun. At $5, it certainly seemed well worth investigating. I picked up all three daily specials at the bakery's window in Bed-Stuy this Sunday (for roughly the same amount of money that I would normally spend on a single sit-down brunch), and I can confidently report that these messy paper cup-fulls of hearty brunch servings are not only a steal—they kind of blew my mind. More

Do or Dine: A Whacked-Out But Charming Bed-Stuy Eatery

If pun-laced pre-meal banter annoys you, you may as well stop reading here, because Do or Dine probably isn't for you. Opened in Brooklyn's Bed-Stuy earlier this summer, the restaurant is an intentionally oddball, intentionally free-form eatery with no particular culinary bent (except fried things; and yuzu) and no totally fixed menu ("This whole restaurant is a culinary expression of ADHD," said co-owner Luke Jackson). What you'll eat is sometimes bizarre, sometimes delicious, and occasionally both. More

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