'Wok Skills 101' on Serious Eats

Chinese Noodles 101: How to Make Chow Mein With Four Vegetables

For me, a dim sum brunch isn't complete without a plate of Supreme Soy Sauce Chow Mein. A simple dish of stir-fried thin noodles cooked with bean sprouts and scallions, it's cooked with just a bit of thin, soy-based sauce that coats the noodles in a concentrated layer of flavor. I turn this snack into a meal by adding an array of colorful, crunchy vegetables and tofu. More

Stir-Fried Chow Mein With Four Vegetables

For me, a dim sum brunch isn't complete without a plate of Supreme Soy Sauce Chow Mein. A simple dish of stir-fried thin noodles cooked with bean sprouts and scallions, it's cooked with just a bit of thin, soy-based sauce that coats the noodles in a concentrated layer of flavor. I turn this snack into a meal by adding an array of colorful, crunchy vegetables and tofu. More

Ask The Food Lab: Can I Stir-Fry On An Electric Cooktop?

"I am an avid teen food who adores her asian dishes, especially the creativity of stir fry. Now, I make it all the time but know that my end result could be exceptionally better. You had on the blog about doing the perfect stir fry on the grill but unfortunately I am in a college dorm and only have access to an electric stove. My question is: how does one not steam their vegetables while at the same time not use too much oil AND how do you not burn your corn starch sauce to the pan?" More

The Food Lab: For the Best Stir-Fry, Fire Up the Grill

Take a look in a Chinese restaurant kitchen and you'll see the wok chef tossing the contents of his wok with one hand while scooping up bits of sauce and seasonings with the wide flat ladle held in his other, all the while adjusting two valves set by below the surface with a flick of his knees. An no, we're not going to building a Chinese restaurant kitchen at home today. What we are going to do is work our way through a few different common home methods of stir-frying to see if we can come up with the ideal way to approximate restaurant-quality dishes. More

Wok Skills 101: Indoor Smoking

While you're never going to be able to slow-cook a whole slab of St. Louis style ribs on your stovetop, a wok is an excellent way to add a bit of light smoke flavor to smaller foods. It requires no special equipment other than a wok and a rack. Since the whole thing happens in a tightly sealed foil tent, very little smoke actually enters the room (less than say, searing a few steaks off). More

Wok Skills 101: Stir-Frying Basics

Stir-frying makes for the quintessential weeknight supper. It's my go-to method when I have a fridge full of ingredients and a half hour to put dinner on the table. Because the actual cooking is so fast, it's an ideal summer meal—no heating up the apartment with a hot oven or a long-simmering pot. Since ingredients cook so fast and retain so much crunch, it's also the ideal way to showcase all the beautiful spring and summer produce that's around these days—there's no reason that stir-fries have to stick to traditional Chinese ingredients! Asparagus, corn, summer squashes, string beans, peas, fava beans, all of them make for wonderful stir-fries. More

Wok Skills 101: How to Deep Fry at Home

I'd be willing to wager that anyone who complains how difficult and messy it is to deep-fry at home has never tried deep-frying in a wok. Why don't people fry at home? The most common answers are: it's messy, it's expensive ("What do I do with all the leftover oil?"), and it's unhealthy. Well a wok can certainly help solve your first two problems. You're on your own for the third. This is our second piece in this week's Wok Skills 101 series. More

Wok Skills 101: How to Steam in a Wok

I've long-touted the wok as the most versatile pan in the kitchen. Now I aim to prove that claim. Each day this week, we'll pick a different basic cooking technique the wok excels at, along with a couple simple recipes to highlight them. We'll cover steaming, frying, stir-frying, smoking, braising. Up first: steaming More

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