'Chinese' on Serious Eats

From the Archives: For the Best Stir-Fry, Fire Up the Grill

Stir-frying may seem simple—just heat up a wok, toss in your ingredients, stir until cooked, and serve. But looks can be deceiving, and your average homemade stir-fry will rarely have that characteristic smoky, complex flavor you'll get at a good Chinese restaurant. It's called wok hei—literally, breath of the wok—and you can only get it from extreme heat. Here are the best ways to replicate it at home. More

Curried Singapore Noodles: Probably Not From Singapore, Still Delicious

It's not entirely clear where Singapore noodles—the stir-fried curried rice noodles with shrimp, pork, and vegetables—come from, though it's unlikely Singapore is the source. Regardless, they're a stir-fry classic, and are easy to make at home. Here's what you need to know, from how to choose the right rice noodles to how to make the stir-fry work on a home burner. More

Singapore Noodles

It's not entirely clear where Singapore noodles—the stir-fried curried rice noodles with shrimp, pork, and vegetables—come from, though it's unlikely Singapore is the source. Regardless, they're a stir-fry classic, and are easy to make at home. Here's what you need to know, from how to choose the right rice noodles to how to make the stir-fry work on a home burner. More

Brooklyn's Great Unsung Chinatown: A Food Tour of Avenue U

There are more Chinatowns than meet the eye in New York. In Brooklyn, Sunset Park gets all the attention, but locals know of another Chinatown farther south, a stretch of Avenue U from Coney Island Avenue to Ocean Avenue, that's been home to a growing Chinese community for the past 15 years. There you'll find higher quality cooking than what most of Manhattan's Chinatown restaurants are serving these days. More

How to Make the Best Cashew Chicken at Home

You may not know it, but you've probably eaten a lot of ding in your life. Kung Pao Chicken? Ding! Cashew Chicken? Ding! Confused? Ding! Don't worry, we'll explain what ding is, and give you an awesome recipe for Cashew Chicken Ding with crunchy vegetables like jicama, celery, and bell pepper. More

Cashew Chicken Ding With Jicama, Celery, and Red Bell Pepper

A ding dish is any Chinese stir-fry in which the chicken and vegetables are diced into little cubes, and crunchy ingredients like nuts are added for texture. Kung Pao Chicken is perhaps the best known example, but Cashew Chicken Ding isn't far behind. In this version, the chicken is stir-fried with mushrooms, jicama, celery, bell pepper, and cashews. More

Buddha's Delight (Lo Hon Jai): Chinese Vegetarian Stir-Fry

Tired of the same old vegetarian stir fry? Buddha's Delight is just what you need. A celebratory mixture of multiple vegetables and protein sources (wheat gluten, bean-curd skin, bean-curd puffs, and more), noodles, and a flavorful sauce infused with mushrooms, it's a reminder that vegetarian stir-fries don't have to be the same old ho-hum dish every time. More

Sheng Jian Bao (Pan-fried Pork Soup Dumplings)

Xiao long bao, Shanghai-style soup dumplings, have become legendary for good reason, but so far their doughier pan-fried cousins called sheng jian bao remain much less well-known here in the States. If you love XLB, you need to try sheng jian bao. Here's how to make them, from the flavorful pork filling to the dough wrapper and combo pan-frying and steaming method. More

Dim Sum Classics: How to Make Sticky Rice Wrapped in Lotus Leaf (Lo Mai Gai)

Lo mai gai, the dim sum classic of steamed lotus leaves stuffed with sticky rice and all sorts of delicious goodies, are irresistible. The biggest task is gathering all the ingredients, like the lotus leaves and glutinous rice, as well as Chinese sausage, cured pork belly, and salted egg yolks. Once you've got them rounded up, though, it's a relatively easy and extremely delicious at-home dish. More

Chinese Sticky Rice Wrapped in Lotus Leaf (Lo Mai Gai)

Lo mai gai, the dim sum classic of steamed lotus leaves stuffed with sticky rice and all sorts of delicious goodies, are irresistible from the moment you unwrap one fresh from the steamer and a chorus of aromas hits your nose. The biggest task is gathering all the ingredients, like the lotus leaves and glutinous rice, as well as Chinese sausage, cured pork belly, and salted egg yolks. Once you've got them rounded up, though, it's a relatively easy and extremely delicious at-home dish. More

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