Explore by Tags

Entries tagged with 'Asian'

Slow-Cooked Korean Short Ribs With Green Onion and Pear

Sunday Supper Jennifer Olvera 2 comments

Braised short ribs are one of the most comforting of comfort foods, but they're not exactly summer fare. By borrowing some tricks from Korean cooking—such as flavoring them with a kalbi-style sauce and topping them with refreshing green onion and pear—this version transforms them into a warm-weather-friendly main course. More

Slow-Cooked Korean Short Ribs With Green Onion and Pear

Serious Eats Jennifer Olvera 4 comments

Braised short ribs are one of the most comforting of comfort foods, but they're not exactly summer fare. By borrowing some tricks from Korean cooking—such as flavoring them with a kalbi-style sauce and topping them with refreshing green onion and pear—this version transforms them into a warm-weather-friendly main course. More

Stir-Fried Tripe With Pickled Mustard Greens and Fermented Black Beans

Serious Eats Shao Z. Post a comment

This dish, from the Hakka Chinese community, is an offal lover's dream: snappy omasum (bible) tripe stir-fried with tart mustard greens, fermented black beans, and red chilies. More

Ideas in Food vs. Linguine alle Vongole: Part 2

Ideas in Food 11 comments

Inspired by linguine with clam sauce, this recipe radically reinvents the dish. Incorporating Korean flavors like gochujang (chili paste) and kim chi, replacing the pasta with chewy Korean rice cakes, and adding a flavorful fried onion-and-garlic topping, the result is a complex, layered, and satisfying meal. More

Korean Clam Sauce

Serious Eats Ideas in Food 1 comment

This rich, complex clam sauce was inspired by linguine with clam sauce. Here it's infused with fried alliums, nori, and Korean flavors like gochujang chili paste. It was created to be served with smoked Korean rice cakes, but can also be served on pasta or rice. More

Smoked Rice Cakes with Korean Clam Sauce

Serious Eats Ideas in Food Post a comment

Inspired by linguine with clam sauce, this recipe radically reinvents the dish. Incorporating Korean flavors like gochujang (chili paste) and kim chi, replacing the pasta with chewy Korean rice cakes, and adding a flavorful fried onion-and-garlic topping, the result is a complex, layered, and satisfying meal. More

Chinese Aromatics 101: Stir-Fried Shrimp With Eggs and Chinese Chives

Shao Z. 9 comments

This quick-to-cook stir-fry of eggs with shrimp, Chinese chives, garlic, and ginger is popular among Cantonese home cooks for both its ease and wonderful flavor. It's a good example of the mild aromatic flavor base common to Cantonese cooking, here with Chinese chives in place of the more common scallions. More

Stir-Fried Shrimp With Eggs and Chinese Chives

Serious Eats Shao Z. Post a comment

This quick-to-cook stir-fry of eggs with shrimp, Chinese chives, garlic, and ginger is popular among Cantonese home cooks for both its ease and wonderful flavor. It can be made with or without the shrimp, or with sliced roast pork in place of the shrimp. More

Ideas in Food vs. Linguine alle Vongole: Part 1

Ideas in Food 17 comments

Inspired by the classic Italian pasta dish linguine with clam sauce, the Ideas in Food duo radically reinvents the dish with cryo-shucked clams (don't worry, just a regular freezer is required), Korean chili paste-infused ghee, a rich clam sauce, and smoked rice cakes. This first part kicks the recipe off with all the components you can prep a day in advance. Stay tuned for the full recipe tomorrow. More

Smoked Korean Rice Cakes

Serious Eats Ideas in Food 2 comments

Korean rice cakes are wonderfully chewy, and their subtle flavor is the perfect foil to strong, rich sauces. But that doesn't mean they can't have their own flavor too. Here, the rice cakes are quickly smoked using a makeshift stovetop smoking rig that requires no special equipment beyond a couple of disposable aluminum roasting pans and some wood shavings. More

Chinese Aromatics 101: The Mild and Aromatic Ginger, Scallion, and Garlic Flavor Base

Shao Z. Post a comment

Does China have an aromatic-vegetable equivalent to French mirepoix? Not exactly, but there are some general categories that are helpful in understanding how Chinese flavor bases work. In the second part of this series, we take a closer look at one of them: The more mild ginger, garlic, and scallion flavor base of Guangdong province's famed Cantonese cooking. More

Chinese Aromatics 101: Kung Pao Fish With Dried Chilies and Sichuan Peppercorns

Shao Z. 8 comments

In this series on the most common aromatic flavor bases of Chinese cooking, we're looking first at those regions famous for their spicy garlic-and-chili flavors. Today, Kung Pao made with fish instead of chicken serves as an example of Sichuan's mouth-numbing, hot mala style, characterized by dried chilies, Sichuan peppercorns, and garlic. More

Kung Pao Fish With Dried Chilies and Sichuan Peppercorns

Serious Eats Shao Z. Post a comment

In this variation on Kung Pao chicken, firm white-fleshed fish such as catfish or tillapia is marinated with soy sauce and white pepper, then deep fried until golden. Afterwards, it's stir-fried with classic Sichuan flavors: spicy dried chilies, mouth-numbing Sichuan peppercorns, and garlic. More

Chinese Aromatics 101: Spicy and Sour Stir-Fried Cabbage With Bacon

Shao Z. 3 comments

In this first installment of our series on the most common aromatic flavor bases of Chinese cooking, we look at the famously fiery heat of Hunanese food through the lens of this classic and simple dish of hand-torn cabbage stir-fried with garlic, scallions, and fresh red chilies. More

Chinese Spicy and Sour Stir-Fried Cabbage With Bacon

Serious Eats Daniel Gritzer 6 comments

Hunanese food is famous for its fiery, chili-spiked dishes, and this quick and easy one with hand-torn cabbage, fresh red chilies, garlic, scallions, and bacon, is no exception. In fact, by Hunan standards, this dish is fairly tame. Slightly sour, thanks to the addition of black rice vinegar, the dish is great as part of a multi-course meal where the other dishes are even more intensely flavored and spicy. More

Curry Noodles With Chicken (Kuai-Tiao Kaeng Sai Kai) From 'Simple Thai Food'

Cook the Book Kate Williams 2 comments

Scratch-made chicken curry is a thing of beauty, with far greater complexity than anything that comes out of a jar. Add supple rice noodles and an array of toppings, and consider me satisfied for the next week. More

Kari (Yellow) Curry Paste (Nam Phrik Kaeng Kari) From 'Simple Thai Food'

Serious Eats Kate Williams 2 comments

Use this yellow curry paste in Leela Punyaratabandhu's curry noodles with chicken in her new cookbook, Simple Thai Food. More

Red Curry Paste (Nam Phrik Kaeng Phet) From 'Simple Thai Food'

Serious Eats Kate Williams Post a comment

Use this fiery curry paste in Leela Punyaratabandhu's curry noodles with chicken in her new cookbook, Simple Thai Food. More

Curry Noodles With Chicken (Kuai-Tiao Kaeng Sai Kai) From 'Simple Thai Food'

Serious Eats Kate Williams 6 comments

Scratch-made chicken curry is a thing of beauty, with far greater complexity than anything that comes out of a jar. Add supple rice noodles and an array of toppings, and consider me satisfied for the next week. More

Grilled Steaks With Roasted Tomato Dipping Sauce (Crying Tiger, or Suea Rong Hai Kap Jaeo Ma-Khuea Thet) From 'Simple Thai Food'

Cook the Book Kate Williams 5 comments

Like son-in-law eggs, this "crying tiger" dish of grilled steak with spicy tomato sauce has a mysterious name. No one really knows if the tiger is crying because the steaks are good or bad, or if the sauce is just so spicy that it generates tears. I'm inclined to believe the latter, because if you're grilling rib-eye, it'd be a shame to serve it tough. More

More Posts