'Technique' on Serious Eats

Knife Skills: How to Clean, Trim, and Prepare Artichokes

Artichokes look like the armored tanks of the vegetable world—an impenetrable defense of shield-like leaves and thorny tips. But with the right tools and know-how, it's easy to get them ready for eating. Here are three ways to trim them: all the way down to the heart, minimally for steaming, and also for the classic Roman-Jewish dish carciofi alla giudia. More

How to Make the Ultimate Poutine

A perfect poutine is a trifecta of the best of its three ingredients—fries with a crisp exterior and soft interior, fresh and soft squeaky cheese curds, and a beefy brown gravy that's just flavorful enough without overwhelming the fries or curds. Getting each piece of the puzzle together for an ultimate version like this takes some time, but once complete, the reward is so good you'll go gaga even if you're totally sober. More

How to Make Stir-Fried Beef With Chinese Broccoli

Beef with broccoli is a staple of North American Chinese fast food joints, but the real version of this dish uses Chinese broccoli (gai lan), not the more familiar broccoli florets. Gai lan pairs perfectly with the strips of marinated beef, shallots, garlic, and oyster sauce in this easy dish. More

How to Make Light and Tender Potato Gnocchi

Considering how fundamentally simple they are, potato gnocchi sure do make people nervous. Do it right, and they're light and tender. Do it wrong, and they're gummy little bricks. Here we delve into every major aspect of gnocchi making and explain how each can impact the result. But first take a deep breath, because this doesn't need to be stressful. It can actually be a lot of fun, and an excellent exercise in honing your abilities as a cook. More

Use the Microwave to Dry Your Herbs for Long-Lasting Intense Flavor

Like oysters and princes, herbs are nearly always at their best when they're fresh. But we've all been there: you buy a bunch of parsley from the supermarket for those 2 tablespoons of garnish that you need, a week goes by, and you suddenly find yourself with a whole lot of fresh parsley that's on its way out. What do you do? Compared to other drying methods—like hanging or using a low oven—the microwave produces the most potent dried herbs with the freshest flavor and the brightest color. Here's how to do it. More

How to Make Roman Semolina Gnocchi (Gnocchi alla Romana)

Long before ships brought native crops from the Americas to Europe, Italy was a land without red sauce, corn polenta, or potato gnocchi. But even without the potato, gnocchi still existed, such as in the form of the classic gnocchi alla Romana, this custardy oven-baked version made with semolina, egg, cheese, and butter. You could say these are the OG: the original gnocchi. More

The Science of Pie: 7 Pie Crust Myths That Need to Go Away

The world of pie making abounds in myth, legend, tradition, tall tales, short tales, and other manner of never-been-blind-tested theory. And while learning at your grandmother's (or grandfather's) knee may lead you to excellent pie crust, you're more than likely to pick up a couple of bad habits and un-truths along the way. Today we're going to look at a some of the most common myths in the land of pie crust, poke a few holes in those theories, and come away with some better recipes in the end. Are you ready? More

The Best and Most Accurate Way to Measure Wet and Dry Ingredients for Baking

Proper measuring is a crucial part of successful baking. Unlike cooking, where you can often get away with eyeballing, baking is chemistry and requires precision. Add too much flour to cake batter and the cake may come out tough and dry. Not enough flour and you risk ending up with a badly structured cake that will collapse in the oven. Enter: Measuring 101. Today we're going to talk about the best tools for measuring, how to measure wet versus dry ingredients, why an ounce is not always an ounce, and why you should really, really consider investing in a good digital scale. More

How to Make Perfect Tortellini From Scratch

In the world of labor-intensive foods, tortellini definitely fall into the realm of time-consuming, repetitive tasks. To make a meal for two will take you around half an hour of piping and folding. But it's time well-spent, I promise! They're delicate, flavorful showstoppers that also lend themselves well to cooking with a partner or group of friends. Make it a social event and the time will fly. Plus you'll feel pretty baller doing it. More

How to Make Microwave Popcorn in a Brown Paper Bag

I don't make much popcorn at home: I don't own a dedicated popcorn popper, and the sound of the metal pan scratching on the burner as I shake it back and forth is enough to drive me crazy. The solution lies in a brown paper lunch bag and the microwave. Here's how to make the easiest popcorn ever. More

The Best Way to Mince Garlic

When a recipe calls for minced garlic, just how much does your mincing method matter? From classic chopping to a garlic press and microplane, we explore the relative merits of each technique. Turns out the choice you make can have a drastic effect on the flavor of your food. More

More Posts