'Staten Island' on Serious Eats

Serious Eats Neighborhood Guides: Richard Gibbs' Staten Island

It's not uncommon for chefs working in trendy restaurants located in trendy neighborhoods to live nowhere near where they spend long hours in front of the stove. When Richard Gibbs, the executive chef at Battery Harris in Williamsburg, isn't cooking up what he calls Afro-Latino cuisine or bottling his own barbecue sauces, he's spending time on Staten Island. Here's where he goes to eat. More

Market Tours: Lanka Grocery, Staten Island's Destination Sri Lankan Market

The sloping, tree-lined Victory Boulevard that crisscrosses Staten Island's Tompkinsville neighborhood offers visitors a spectacular view of Manhattan. But it's more than a pretty residential street with views that would make a Brooklyner rethink their rooftop: it's also the heart of the Sri Lankan community that's taken hold on Staten Island (with some great restaurants to boot).

It's also home to Lanka Grocery.

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Skip the Pizza and Get The Sandwiches at Goodfellas Lower East Side

If you were to believe their own hype, you'd think that Goodfellas, a mini-chain started over on Hylan Boulevard in Staten Island back in 1992 was the "WORLD'S BEST PIZZA." Don't believe them? What if they were to tell you that they were voted World's Best Pizza? Yeah, I'm a little skeptical too. I haven't been to the Staten Island locations (there are two now), but I've walked past the Lower East Side storefront on my way up to the pizza haven of the East Village many times. It looks like a generic, cookie-cutter, corporate pizza restaurant—like a Sbarro's with more brick and less brass. But I'm not the kind of guy who judges a pizza before it passes my lips, and I was willing to give the pies a fair shake. More

Date Night: Bayou on Staten Island

Bayou takes the New Orleans theme far, maybe too far, with Louis Armstrong's entire oeuvre looping on the stereo and movie posters for NOLA-set classics like Mardis Gras Massacre adorning the walls. But as the candles flick shadows across the brick walls and "A Kiss to Build a Dream On" starts up, you remember just what a sexy city New Orleans is. More

Nunzio's, a Classic Slice on Staten Island

A minimally beautiful little slice. Life rafts of mozzarella float atop a bright-red sea of fresh-tasting, chunky sauce—it's little more than crushed canned tomatoes, some salt, and a some basil. The crust is crisp and pliant and thin. You'll probably want a couple. More

The Vegetarian Option: Dosa Garden

When it comes to dining in the five boroughs, Staten Island often gets left off of the radar. People are willing to make the trip out to Flushing or Sunset Park, but rarely across the water. I'm sure part of it is the trip itself; to get to Dosa Garden I had to take the train to the ferry, then another train, and then I had to walk (uphill) for almost a mile. Yet the stretch of Victory Boulevard between the Tompkinsville stop of the Staten Island Railroad and the restaurant was positively flush with sights that would make even the most jaded New York foodie sit up and take notice: a roti shop, a Nigerian grocery, and multiple Sri Lankan restaurants. More

Staten Island: Pier 76 a Kissing Cousin of Joe & Pat's

Clockwise from top: If you want a sort of impromptu "making-of" slideshow, click the top image; it's more bonus material than anything, though. An individual-size vodka pie. A large half sausage–half plain pie. [Photographs: Adam Kuban] Pier 76 76 Bay Street, Staten Island NY (near Slosson Terr.; map); 718-447-7437; pier76si.com Getting there: I assume most Staten Islanders have cars and can drive. If you're coming from the other boroughs, it's a short walk from the St. George Ferry Terminal—just make sure to exit near where the buses land and not on western exit. Walk toward SI Borough Hall and... More

Staten Island: Lee's Tavern

Lee's Tavern 60 Hancock Street, Staten Island NY 10305 (at Garretson Ave.; map); 718-667-9749; Pizza Style: Bar pizza Oven Type: Gas The Skinny: Classic version of bar pizza Price: Bar size, $5.25; traditional large, $9; toppings, $1 or $2 extra, respectively There are no signs outside Lee's Tavern to indicate that it is in fact Lee's Tavern. And walking into the place, there's not much of an initial indication that one would be able to get a fine example of bar pizza there. The place is worn to a dull patina—the vinyl floor and irregularly matched tables and chairs,... More

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