'Singapore Day' on Serious Eats

Serious Eats at Singapore Day

On Saturday, most of the Serious Eats crew trekked to New York City's Central Park to check out the eats at the inaugural Singapore Day. By the time we arrived, the place was packed. Long lines of people, mostly Singaporean expats, had queued up in front of the various hawker stalls set up around Wollman Rink, which, in colder months, serves as an ice-skating venue.... More

Singapore Day Eats: Kaya/Kaya Roti

In anticipation of Singapore Day in New York's Central Park, we'll be posting descriptions periodically over the week of the country's signature street food, which is sold there in hawker centers. Here, we give you ... Kaya/Kaya Roti: "Made from eggs, coconut milk, sugar, and pandan leaves for that unmistakable fragrance, kaya can come green in color if you prefer the pandan flavor and fragrance. It can also come brown in color if you prefer the flavor and fragrance of palm sugar or gula melaka. Kaya is great on toast with tea or coffee. It can be especially tantalizing with a couple of runny eggs." Photograph from daxiang on Flickr... More

Singapore Day Eats: Fried Hokkien Mee

In anticipation of Singapore Day in New York's Central Park, we'll be posting descriptions of the country's signature street food, which is sold there in hawker centers. Here, we give you ... Fried hokkien mee: "A favorite among Singaporeans, fried hokkien mee is served with fresh and delicious slices of squid, prawns, slices of fish cake, vegetables and strips of pork. For the best eating experience, this hokkien mee is served wet and not too dry, and you may want to squeeze the lime juice into your spoon first, remove the lime seeds, and pour it onto your hokkien mee. For added enjoyment, sambal chili and lime juice must be mixed together with the noodles." Photograph from Intensify on... More

Singapore Day Eats: Chili Crab

In anticipation of Singapore Day in New York's Central Park, we'll be posting descriptions of the country's signature street food, which is sold there in hawker centers. Here, we give you ... Chili Crab: "With a hearty gravy made from fresh red chiles, tomato sauce, fresh eggs, and spring onions, it's best eaten with your fingers. Don't bother to try looking genteel—use your teeth to crack the shells, suck out the succulent meat, and if you have to, hit the extra-hard shell on the table top to break it. Let the gravy run down your arm, clean it up with cubes of French bread or Chinese buns (known as mantou) that are served as a side dish. All in... More

Singapore Day Eats: Char Kway Teow

In anticipation of Singapore Day in New York's Central Park, we'll be posting descriptions of the country's signature street food, which is sold there in hawker centers. Here, we give you ... Char Kway Teow: This comes especially in savory and sweet soy sauce with or without chilli whichever your taste buds prefer. Hardcore Char Kway Teow lovers can also insist on raw or half cooked see hum or cockles for the extra flavor and texture.... More

Coming to America: The World's Greatest Street Food

According to the late, great Johnny Apple, Singapore has the best street food in the world. I salivated after reading Johnny's piece about it in the New York Times: But Singapore already has gastronomic attractions aplenty. Start with its unmatched street food — chili crabs and chicken rice, laksa and satay and fish head curry — served in hundreds of hawkers’ stalls. Fast, cheap and delicious, its hygiene is certified by the ever-vigilant Ministry of the Environment and Water Resources. (K. F. Seetoh’s exhaustive guidebook, Makansutra, will lead you to the top practitioners.) Sounds good, don't you think? Sadly, I knew I wasn't headed to Singapore any time soon, so I had given up hope of trying what sounded like... More

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