'Potato' on Serious Eats

The Japanese Way to Make Potato Salad

Japanese versions of Western dishes, known as yōshoku cuisine, may look like the originals that inspired them, but the flavor is unmistakably Japanese. Take this potato salad, which derives its unique flavor from Japanese mayo, rice vinegar, and hot mustard. More

Hold the Mayo, Make Grilled Potato Salad for Your Next Cookout

I've been a fan of grilled potatoes ever since the first time I tried them, and a well-constructed, bright, fresh, balanced potato salad is one of my cookout go-tos. So I have no idea why it took so long to occur to me to put the two together. But making a great grilled potato salad is not quite as simple as throwing your potatoes on the grill, cutting them up, and tossing them with mayonnaise or dressing. Here's how to finesse it. More

The Ultimate Poutine

A perfect poutine is a trifecta of the best of its three ingredients—fries with a crisp exterior and soft interior, fresh and soft squeaky cheese curds, and a beefy brown gravy that's just flavorful enough without overwhelming the fries or curds. Getting each piece of the puzzle together for an ultimate version like this takes some time, but once complete, the reward is so good you'll go gaga even if you're totally sober. More

How to Make Light and Tender Potato Gnocchi

Considering how fundamentally simple they are, potato gnocchi sure do make people nervous. Do it right, and they're light and tender. Do it wrong, and they're gummy little bricks. Here we delve into every major aspect of gnocchi making and explain how each can impact the result. But first take a deep breath, because this doesn't need to be stressful. It can actually be a lot of fun, and an excellent exercise in honing your abilities as a cook. More

Light and Tender Potato Gnocchi With Sage-Butter Sauce

We're not going to lie: Potato gnocchi can be a little tricky and require some practice to get right. But if you know a few basic rules, it's really not that hard to make ones that are light and tender, not leaden and gummy. This recipe walks you through those steps, starting with choosing a gnocchi-friendly potato and cooking it the right way; then we leave it up to you whether to add egg yolk or not (yolks make a dough that's easier to work with, but also firmer); and finally we add just enough flour to make a cohesive dough while being careful not to overwork it to the point of gumminess. The result are lovely little gnocchi in a sage-butter sauce that will prove that good gnocchi aren't out of reach. More

The Food Lab: How to Make the Best Chorizo and Potato Tacos

Crispy potato and chorizo are a classic taco combination—one that taco trucks usually get wrong. The ideal potato and chorizo taco should be deeply browned and flavorful, each crisp cube of potato coated in a thin layer of bright red fat packed with spicy, meaty flavor. The chorizo itself should have a range of textures from tender and moist to crisp. It's a very straight-forward process to get there, but it does take a bit of time. Here's how I do it. More

Crispy Potato and Chorizo Tacos

Crispy potato and chorizo are a classic taco combination—one that taco trucks usually get wrong. The ideal potato and chorizo taco should be deeply browned and flavorful, each crisp cube of potato coated in a thin layer of bright red fat packed with spicy, meaty flavor. The chorizo itself should have a range of textures from tender and moist to crisp. More

Pump up the Party With Cheesy Poutine Poppers

There's a lot to love about poutine, the Canadian dish of brown gravy- and cheese curd-topped fries. But it's not exactly a good finger food at a party, unless you like the idea of dozens of gravy-coated fingers being wiped on the couch. Well, we'd like to introduce the solution to that problem: the Poutine Popper. More

Quick and Easy Dairy and Fat-Free Colombian Vegetable Soup (Ajiaco Negro)

This quick and easy dairy-free, fat-free Colombian vegetable soup comes out creamy and comforting thanks to the natural thickening power of potatoes. No added cream, milk, or butter means that the soup shines with vegetable flavor from peas, fava beans, carrots, and carrots. The stovetop version takes about 45 minutes of hands-off work while the pressure cooker can cut that time down to under half an hour. More

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