'Nigel Slater' on Serious Eats

Nigel Slater's Salad of Game, Grapes, and Verjuice

Grapes are no strangers in chicken salad, adding sweetness and a burst of freshness to what can often be a rich, heavy dish. In Ripe, Nigel Slater riffs on this combination in A Salad of Game, Grapes, and Verjuice, upping the salad's grape quotient by using verjuice—the juice of unripe grapes—in the vinaigrette dressing. More

Nigel Slater's Crisp Pork Belly, Sweet Peach Salsa

Nigel Slater's Crisp Pork Belly, Sweet Peach Salsa from Ripe is a fabulous surprise of a recipe. The warm, vaguely Asian spice blend rubbed into the belly may not seem an obvious complement to a Southwestern-style peach salsa, but a quick glance through the ingredients reveals commonalities: cilantro, lime, and chile all play their parts in both cuisines, and peaches themselves are one of America's favorite imports from China. Not to mention that once the peach salsa is piled on top of thinly sliced, quiveringly rich belly, it's hard to imagine doubting Slater's genius. More

Nigel Slater's Crisp Pork Belly, Sweet Peach Salsa

Nigel Slater's Crisp pork belly, sweet peach salsa from Ripe is a fabulous surprise of a recipe. The warm, vaguely Asian spice blend rubbed into the belly may not seem an obvious complement to a Southwestern-style peach salsa, but a quick glance through the ingredients reveals commonalities: cilantro, lime, and chile all play their parts in both cuisines, and peaches themselves are one of America's favorite imports from China. Not to mention, that once the peach salsa is piled on top of thinly sliced, quiveringly rich belly, it's hard to imagine doubting Slater's genius. More

Nigel Slater's Hot, Sweet Plum Chutney

Made with plums, raisins, cider and malt vinegars, and just enough muscovado sugar to sweeten and thicken the preserve, this chutney puts all of those jars languishing in fridge doors to shame. At once spicy, sweet, and tangy it plays well not only on a cheese board, but also piled on leftover roast pork and smeared on a turkey sandwich. More

Nigel Slater's Hot, Sweet Plum Chutney

Made with plums, raisins, cider and malt vinegars, and just enough muscovado sugar to sweeten and thicken the preserve, this chutney puts all of those jars languishing in fridge doors to shame. At once spicy, sweet, and tangy it plays well not only on a cheese board, but also piled on leftover roast pork and smeared on a turkey sandwich. More

Cook the Book: 'Ripe: A Cook in the Orchard'

It may have hit American bookshelves earlier this summer, but there isn't a better time than the dog days of late August to open up Nigel Slater's Ripe: A Cook in the Orchard. This week, we're making the most of late summer fruits in a variety of dishes. First, we're turning plums into a Hot, Sweet Plum Chutney; next, we'll pair stone fruit with pork two ways, and you can look forward to an elegant dish of Duck with Figs and Barolo. Enter here to win your copy! More

Cook the Book: Prawns, Leaves, and Limes

This five-minute stir-fry is full of the sort of punchy, sour flavors that you'd find in a bowl of tom yum soup. Matchsticks of ginger and rounds of lemongrass are browned with scallions and chiles. The shrimp are thrown in with a mix of fish sauce, lime juice and sugar. It's ideal for those evenings when you're craving something a bit out of the ordinary, flavor-wise but don't really feel like spending an hour-plus on it. On the table in just about 20 minutes and served with a bowl of steamed rice, these prawns will beat the pants off Thai takeout any day. More

Cook the Book: Classic Creamed Spinach

This recipe for Classic Creamed Spinach from Nigel Slater's Tender: A Cook and His Vegetable Patch showed me exactly what my spinach was missing: a roux. Slater begins his creamed spinach by infusing milk with black peppercorns, bay leaf, and an onion. The milk is simmered and added to a mix of butter and flour, then whisked into a very thick, creamy roux. Spinach, cream, and nutmeg are incorporated at the very last minute, resulting in the kind of creamed spinach that you'd order at a steakhouse that's been around for longer than you have. More

Cook the Book: A Tart of Asparagus and Tarragon

Since my CSA started a few weeks ago I've been inundated with asparagus with at least a bunch or two of green-purple stalks popping up in my crate every Tuesday. I've been steaming them and topping them with hollandaise and charring them with soy, but what I've really been searching for is a recipe that takes asparagus from a side to a complete meal. This Tart of Asparagus and Tarragon from Nigel Slater's Tender: A Cook and His Vegetable Patch does exactly that, by baking tender blanched stalks into a cheesy, custardy pie. More

Lamb Steaks with Peas and Mint

Adapted from Tender: A Cook and His Vegetable Patch, these Lamb Steaks with Peas and Mint are served with a purée of a springier vegetable—sweet peas. Briefly boiled until their sugars release, buzzed in the blender with leaves of mint and melted butter, these peas would be wonderful with just about anything grilled—scallops, sausages, steaks, or lamb. Author Nigel Slater serves his with little thyme-rubbed lamb steaks. By letting the steaks (or rib chops, if you'd prefer) sit in a slick of chopped thyme and olive oil for half an hour before grilling, the thyme has a chance to really soak in and lightly char once it hits the grill. More

Cook the Book: Beet Seed Cake

You might assume that this Beet Seed Cake would be made with well, beet seeds. Before you start running to the garden center in search of ingredients you should probably know this cake is made with beets and seeds, not beet seeds. Sounds weird, right? I thought so too but in the intro of Tender: A Cook and His Vegetable Patch, Nigel Slater likens it to another genius root vegetable-based dessert, the carrot cake. More

Cook the Book: 'Tender: A Cook and His Vegetable Patch'

It would be easy to call Tender a vegetable cookbook but it's so much more than that. For example, the chapter on leeks: Slater introduces the leek, talks about his relationship with it, fond memories it evokes, and even the variety he prefers in his home kitchen (Musselburgh).Slater treats each vegetable in Tender with the same sort of reverence, whether it's something showy like a summer tomato or a humble onion. Enter to win a copy here. More

More Posts